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10+ GivingTuesday Tips and Resources

2 – OptimizationsHave you reviewed your donation pages and emails for mobile readiness? Something as simple as page load time can make or break your conversions – did you know that if your page takes more than 3 seconds to load on mobile you’ve already lost over 40% of your opportunities? Pingdom 2018 page load time study. 4 – The askCome in with a clear message and a clear ask across communications on GivingTuesday. Check out GivingTuesday.org’s document on securing a match and don’t forget to add a progress meter to your donation pages so supporters will see their impact.
Posted in Beauty
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10 Essential Questions to Ask Before Selecting a New eCRM System

This post is provided courtesy of Engaging Networks Accredited Partner, Zuri GroupSo, you’re ready to transition to a new nonprofit eCRM system. An electronic customer relationship management (eCRM) system transition requires thoughtful consideration of your team’s immediate needs and future goals. Before deciding which eCRM to implement, it’s essential to determine how exactly your current system both benefits and hinders those goals. Improving your team’s use of the current system is nearly always the faster and much less expensive route. Can you identify business objectives that the current system simply isn’t capable of meeting?
Posted in Beauty
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2020 Year in Review

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Incredible
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2020 Tied for Warmest Year on Record

Earth’s global average surface temperature in 2020 tied with 2016 for the warmest year on record, according to an analysis by NASA. The bar chart below shows this year in the context of the past 140 years in the modern temperature record. Tracking global temperature trends provides a critical indicator of the impact of human activities—specifically, greenhouse gas emissions—on our planet. Scientists from Europe’s Copernicus program also have 2020 tying 2016 as the warmest year on record, while the UK Met Office ranked 2020 as the second-warmest. NASA’s full 2020 surface temperature data set and the complete methodology used to make the temperature calculations are available online.
Posted in Beauty
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30 years later, traces of an oil spill persist

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Nature
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32 Creative Travel Photography Tips for Beginners

Photography is an art. That too fine one! Whether you’re a total beginner or you know your way around a camera, the practical tips and easy photography hacks in this article will show you how to take your travel pictures from average to amazing.
Posted in Incredible
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5 Questions with Dr. Amala Mahadevan

Dr. Amala Mahadevan is a physical oceanographer at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Mahadevan: Ocean currents—particularly, swirling currents known as eddies—can affect plankton in two primary ways. First, they can contribute to their growth by bringing up nutrients from ocean depths to the surface. Mahadevan: Taking dissolved carbon from the surface layer and transporting it to deeper layers of the ocean causes some of the carbon to become sequestered. This, in turn, can decrease the amount of upward mixing of nutrients into the surface ocean.
Posted in Incredible
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A checkup for the oceans reveals threats to human health

The health of the world’s ocean is in serious decline—and human health is suffering as a result. That’s according to a comprehensive report investigating the societal impacts of marine pollution, published in the December 3 Annals of Global Health. The report, co-authored by John Stegeman, WHOI biologist and director of the Woods Hole Center for Oceans and Human Health, takes a deep dive into the impacts of climate change, plastic dumping, nutrient runoff, oil spills, and other pollutants on human well-being. “This report is part of a global effort to address questions related to oceans and human health,” says Stegeman. Yet people in lower-income nations bear the majority of the burden, despite their relatively low contribution to the problem.
Posted in Nature
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A Remote Lake with a Rich History

Surrounded by arid and barren land in east Africa, Lake Turkana is the largest permanent desert lake in the world. The image above shows Lake Turkana (formerly Lake Rudolf) on December 10, 2020, as observed by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite. Like many desert lakes, Lake Turkana is a salty, closed basin. Many intact fossils have been found on Lake Turkana’s eastern shore around Koobi Fora Ridge. Today, the area around Lake Turkana is sparsely populated by people due to its isolated location and inadequate fresh water.
Posted in Best of
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A Meeting of Smoke and Storms

In September 2020, historic wildfires on the U.S. West Coast lofted plumes of smoke high into the atmosphere. Pushed by prevailing winds that sweep air from west to east, satellites tracked the smoke as it spread widely across much of the continental United States. The series of images above shows the abundance and distribution of black carbon, a type of aerosol found in wildfire smoke, as it rode jet stream winds across the United States. By September 15, the smoke had begun to encounter the outer edge of Paulette, whose presence helped steer smoke around the northwestern side of the storm. While satellite maps like this show smoke spanning the entire United States, that does not mean the smoke had equally strong effects on air quality at ground level everywhere.
Posted in Best of
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A new way of “seeing” offshore wind power cables

Internet cables aren’t the only form of underwater wiring vulnerable to snags on the seafloor. High voltage cables supplying power from the mainland to offshore wind farms are also easy targets if they’re not adequately protected. These black, rubber-coated cables are not the most glamorous components of offshore wind—but they’re critical veins of power that wind operators, developers, and coastal communities rely on to keep this brand new source of clean energy in the U.S. going. “Most people focus on the spinning blades of turbines to ensure that an offshore wind energy project will be successful, but the subsea cables that bring that power to land are equally as important,” said Anthony Kirincich, a physical oceanographer at WHOI. “Power can be cut by cable damage from ship anchors, fishing trawlers, or storms.
Posted in Incredible
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A Sea of Hazards

Today, more than half-a-century later, environmental pollution—air, land, and water combined—is responsible for an estimated nine million premature deaths per year. In our oceans, pollution takes a variety of forms: toxic metals, industrial chemicals, and microplastics, to name a few. “Ocean pollutants are a critical aspect of environmental pollution as a whole, given their ability to bioaccumulate and move through the marine food web,” says John Stegeman. This is because large predator fish like tuna can accumulate 10 million times as much mercury as the waters they swim in. Mercury pollution stems from activities like burning coal, making cement, gold mining, and in the case of the Minamata disaster, chemical dumping.
Posted in Incredible
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A Short Journey to the Center of the Earth

But at Gros Morne National Park, people can step on fragments of the mantle without having to dig an inch. On October 3, 2017, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 acquired natural-color imagery of Gros Morne National Park. Those mountains have since eroded and left behind the gneiss and granite peaks of the Long Range. The park contains some of the tallest peaks of the Long Range mountains, including Big Level and Gros Morne Mountain (French for “great somber”). Gros Morne National Park also features some recent geologic history at the Western Brook Pond.
Posted in Nature
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A Sliver of Mexico’s “Mother Mountain Range”

Stretching about 1,000 kilometers (700 miles), the Sierra Madre Oriental is a range of folded mountains in northeastern Mexico. The mountain range runs adjacent to several large cities, including Monterrey (capital of Nueva León state) and Saltillo (capital of Coahuila state). The Sierra Madre Oriental is one of three main mountain ranges surrounding the Mexican Plateau, which covers much of northern and central Mexico. Each range bears the name “Sierra Madre”—Spanish for “Mother Mountain Range.” The Sierra Madre Occidental stands along the western side of the plateau, Sierra Madre del Sur lies to the south, and Sierra Madre Oriental stands on the east. The Sierra Madre Oriental connects with the Sierra Madre Occidental through the Trans-volcanic Mexican belt.
Posted in Eye Candy
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A transient iceberg kingdom

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Eye Candy
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A Swirl of Old Supercontinent Silt

Svalbard, an archipelago between mainland Norway and the North Pole, is known as something of a mecca for geologists. The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 acquired this natural-color image of red water pooling in a shallow meltwater lake near the terminus of Holmström glacier. Sometimes called the Old Red Sandstone, the rock layer formed on land when sand and other sediments were trapped in a basin enclosed by series of mountain ranges. The mountain ranges emerged when several of the world’s land masses were smashed together in a supercontinent called Laurussia, sometimes called the Old Red Continent. “The red Devonian rock is fairly soft and erodes easily,” explained University of Edinburgh geologist Geoffrey Boulton.
Posted in Incredible
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A tunnel to the Twilight Zone

When you’re hungry, wouldn’t it be nice to just slip into a tunnel that rushes you off to a grand buffet? It sounds like something Elon Musk might dream up, but it turns out, certain species of sharks appear to have this luxury. Now, according to a new study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), scientists are seeing a similar activity with blue sharks, which dive through these natural, spinning tunnels at mealtime. The eddies draw warm water deep into the twilight zone where temperatures are normally considerably colder, allowing blue sharks to forage across areas of the open ocean that are often characterized by low prey abundance in surface waters. To track their movements, the researchers tagged more than a dozen blue sharks off the Northeast Coast of the U.S. and monitored them for a period of nine months.
Posted in Incredible
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A Watery Day for Lake Lefroy

For much of the year, an efflorescent salt crust makes Lake Lefroy stand out as a bright, white spot in satellite images. But after heavy rains, the ephemeral lake in Western Australia takes on a different look. Large volumes of water do not persist for long in Lake Lefroy because the region’s hot, dry climate encourages evaporation. While water pooled in early February in a pattern that resembles a tropical fish, it’s unlikely the pattern will last. Lake Lefroy is frequently reshaped by changes in the prevailing winds that transport water back and forth between different parts of the playa.
Posted in Eye Candy
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African Dust Plume Blankets the Caribbean

Beyond the towering storms, the dull gray-brown pall of a dust plume is draped across the Caribbean Sea and Atlantic Ocean. The haze is so dense that it completely obscures the island of Cuba from the astronaut’s view. This huge dust mass had been lofted ten days earlier from the vast sandy surfaces of the western Sahara Desert. The dust plume stretched across the Atlantic Ocean from northwestern Africa, a distance of more than 7000 kilometers (4,200 miles). In 1994 and 2001 astronauts took photographs of less dense Saharan dust plumes over the same region.
Posted in Eye Candy
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After a Year in the Ice, the Biggest-Ever Arctic Science Mission Ends

So on July 30, they removed the last remaining equipment from the ice. “And then we woke up the next morning and our ice floe was in a thousand pieces,” he said. Instead, in late May, the Polarstern left its ice floe to rendezvous with two smaller ships carrying Dr. Shupe and others off the Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard. Abandoning the floe for nearly a month affected some of the research, the expedition’s leaders said at the time. Some people were really, really worried.”
Posted in Incredible
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Ancient storms could help predict shifts in tropical cyclone hotspots

"So we can expect to see the opposite effect in the deep tropics -- a decrease in tropical cyclones close to the equator. Radiocarbon dating helped researchers work out the timing of ancient storms in the region, revealing an uptick in cyclone frequency during the Little Ice Age. By analyzing tree rings, coral cores and fossilized marine organisms, scientists were able to reconstruct ancient changes in climate conditions. RELATED More frequent tropical storms mean less recovery time for coastlines"It turns out the past provides some useful analogies for the climate change that we're currently undergoing. Now we're trying to go back and determine the drivers of tropical cyclones," said Donnelly, a WHOI senior scientist.
Posted in Incredible
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An Immersive Experience: How Renowned Photographers are Captivating Audiences with Prints

Great photography in a printed form has the power to truly captivate audiences and enhance the visual message that photographers convey. Ken Browar and Deborah Ory/NYC Dance ProjectAmong many important partnerships in Ken Browar’s life is one with his wife-turned-photographic collaborator Deborah Ory. Both Browar and Ory are fans of traditional printing and were pleasantly surprised with how much they liked this new process. “It felt like the images were floating, like they were 3-dimensional,” Ory says of their exhibition of metal prints mounted on a black wall at Lincoln Center. Making large-scale 40 x 60-inch dye-sublimation on metal prints offers a particular visual quality that brings more light and life to his works.
Posted in Nature
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Antarctic Ice Sheet Loss Expected to Affect Future Climate Change

Research simulates dramatic climate impacts for future Antarctic ice sheet meltIn a new climate modeling study that looked at the impacts of accelerated ice melt from the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) on future climate, a team of climate scientists led by Alan Condron at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), reports that future ice-sheet melt is expected to have significant effects on global climate. The study predicts how future climate conditions could change under high and low greenhouse gas emissions scenarios, while accounting for accelerated melting of the AIS. Scientists have long recognized that future meltwater input from the Antarctic will affect the Southern Ocean and global climate, but ice-sheet processes are not currently included in even the most state-of-the-art climate prediction simulations. “In the ice sheet models run by my co-authors Rob DeConto and David Pollard, large parts of the West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) rapidly collapse about 100 years from now,” says Condron. This subsurface warming could make the ice sheet much more unstable and accelerate rates of sea level rise beyond current projections,” Condron says.
Posted in Beauty
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As Hurricane Laura raged, silent sentinels kept watch from below

According to an NAS publication, the Loop Current is the dominant physical process in the Gulf waters and, as such, can impact everything from oil and gas operations to ecologically-based management of marine resources in the region. It can also have a very direct impact on hurricane development and intensity. “When a tropical storm moves over warm Loop Current waters, it fuels the storm so it can become a hurricane,” says Khazmutdinova. She says that storms can also intensify when they travel over ring-shaped eddies that break off from the main current. “And then we can pump that information into hurricane forecasts to improve predictions there as well.”
Posted in Incredible
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ARRI Signature Primes Delivered in Full

ARRI’s Signature Prime lenses for large-format filmmaking cameras are now available in full through camera rental houses and for sale via venues like B&H. Ranging in price from $24,920 to $39,950 apiece, the 16 focal lengths were first announced alongside the ARRI ALEXA LF in February of 2018. Examples of the different ARRI Signature Prime focal lengths. The large-format ALEXA LF sensor is slightly bigger than full frame.) From 12mm to 280mm, the ARRI Signature Primes have been delivered in full as a set.
Posted in Beauty
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Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada by Ron Hallam

Picture StoryThe first Cold Snap of winter, temperature down -30 brought with it a layer of new snow and mist and frost from the yet to be frozen lakes. The natural hot spring that fed the lake added to the mist and atmosphere as the sun, moving slow and rising late, washed the sky in color. I was standing in the hot spring stream which kept my feet comfortable and worked with a remote trigger in my pocket to keep my hands comfortable. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers. Benefits of VIP membership:• Your own portfolio page – click here to see sample• We promote your portfolio monthly to over 700,000 followers• Download 12 new issues of the magazine every year• Download ALL back issues• Download 2 premium eBooks worth £19.45.
Posted in Incredible
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Behold the strawberry squid

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Beauty
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Belize and Guatemala Photography Adventure Dec 2021

Belize and Guatemala were at the center of the Ancient Maya Civilization and provide a wealth of archaeological sites to stimulate our photographic juices. Our Belize and Guatemala Photography Adventure explores the past, the rainforest and Xibalba (the Mayan word for the underworld). There will be plenty of opportunities to photograph cave openings with ambient light and to use single flashes as well. We will work our photographic magic on the ancient Mayan cities such as Tikal, Carocol, Yaxhá, Cahal Pech and more! Price:$5,300 USD Double Occupancy, $6,800 USD Single OccupancyPlease see our COVID-19 Response and Offer on the Directory Company Page for Nature Photography Adventures
Posted in Eye Candy
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Below Old Mans Cave, Logan, Ohio, USA by Roy Goldsberry

Picture StoryI have been to visit Hocking Hills State Park near Logan, Ohio several times. There are several, separated areas that make up the park, and we decided to start with Old Mans Cave the next morning. In the stream at that spot, there is a rock shelf that the water flows over, and it had made an ice fall in addition to the waterfall. The pool just below that had also frozen over very smoothly, and allowed for a very fine reflection of the ice fall formations. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
Posted in Incredible
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Bengal Tiger Photo Safari February 2022

This 7-day Bengal Tiger photo safari / workshop, located in Bandhavgarh National Park in India, takes you into the wild in luxury. There you will be guided by our professional guides to find the Wild Bengal Tiger and helped by our award-winning wildlife photographers to gain those memorable wildlife photographs that you crave for. From the Bengal Tiger and the Indian Leopard, all the way to the many species of deer and forest birds, you will have the opportunity to photograph and create a showcase of professional images and gain those memorable experiences of an Indian Wild Tiger Safari. Located right outside of Bandhavgarh National Park, our five-star lodge awaits your arrival where you will be accompanied with beverages and a very warm welcome. Each evening you will get the chance to fine dine with complimentary beverages of all kinds to make your Indian safari a memory of a lifetime.
Posted in Beauty
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Bow Lake, Canada by John Pedersen

Picture StoryLast winter before the pandemic shut down travel, I ventured to Canada to photograph the area around Lake Louise and the Icefield Parkway. On this particular day we were traveling back from a sunrise shoot at Abraham Lake and the methane bubbles. However, when we came upon Bow Lake and saw the way the clouds were in the sky and the broad unbroken expanse of the frozen lake, we knew we had to stop. With a lot of work, I managed to stomp out a trail down to the edge of the lake were I set up my tripod and camera. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Beauty
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Biei, Hokkaido, Japan by Francis Ansing

Picture StoryThis image was taken in Biei, Hokkaido, Japan. This is probably the most famous lone tree in Hokkaido. I braved the -20 degrees Celsius during the morning of February 7, 2020 to scout around and look for possible foregrounds. One of the best times to visit Biei, Hokkaido is during summer where there are a lot of flowers making the scene vivid and colorful. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
Posted in Best of
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Brisingids sea stars are the velcro of the deep sea

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of
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Buron, Aubrac, France by Fabien Guittard

Picture StoryFailing Lapland, I plunged a few days in the snow of the Aubrac plateau, where a few isolated burons (huts) are waiting for the end of winter under a thick layer of snow. A "buron" is a stone building, covered with lauzes or slates, found on the "montagnes", high altitude pastures that valley stockbreeders own and exploit seasonally in the Cantal, Aubrac, Cézallier and Dore mountains. They are used to make cheese: Cantal, Laguiole or Fourme d'Aubrac, and Saint-Nectaire during the summer months (from mid-May to mid-October), and to house the cheese makers. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers. Benefits of VIP membership:• Your personal portfolio page – click here to see sample• We promote your portfolio monthly to over 400,000 followers• Download 12 new issues of the magazine every year• Download ALL back issues• Download 2 premium eBooks worth £19.45.
Posted in Best of
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Brunt Breaking Up with Antarctica this Year?

Two years after the Brunt Ice Shelf seemed poised to produce a berg twice the size of New York City, the ice is still hanging on. The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 acquired this image of the Brunt Ice Shelf on January 12, 2021. These areas are stretched thin, and can be melted from above or below, making them more prone to forming rifts and eventually breaking away. The Brunt Ice Shelf appears to be in a period of instability, with cracks spreading across its surface. The detailed view shows the new rift growing away from an area known as the McDonald Ice Rumples.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Can icebergs be towed to water-starved cities?

He’s been studying the possibility of towing an iceberg from Antarctica to Cape Town, South Africa, which recently experienced a water crisis. “Large icebergs could be used to alleviate drought and supply a city with water,” Condron says. It’s pure and fresh.”The big towResearchers have floated the idea of long-distance iceberg towing for decades. He says that with today’s sophisticated computer modeling technologies, he can accurately simulate a long-distance iceberg tow to Cape Town. Researchers have proposed mooring such bergs about 18 miles off of Cape Town in order to harvest water from them.
Posted in Beauty
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Can we find medical answers in the ocean?

Take the deep ocean, for example, where mineral-laden fluid superheated by magma gushes from hydrothermal vents. Who knows—maybe we’ll find new antimicrobials when we start to look in deep ocean habitats.”The deep ocean has already given us compounds to treat cancer, inflammation, and nerve damage. But breakthroughs have also come from the ocean depths in the form of diagnostic tools. Identifying microbial processes in the deep ocean is an essential first step for discerning human applications, says WHOI microbiologist Julie Huber. But hydrothermal vents have a remarkable diversity of microbes, including genetic diversity.
Posted in Incredible
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Can you spot the eunumid crab?

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Incredible
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Canyonlands NP, Utah, USA by Peter Boehringer

Everybody wants to catch the moment with the orange glow on the arch plus a sunburst in the frame to boot. Let’s be honest, it is a cool shot and you can’t blame people who want to witness and photograph the moment. The only requirement is having a wide angle lens and drive up to the trailhead very early in the morning. BUT, what if contrary to everybody else who is using a wide angle lens you get out your 200 mm lens? Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
Posted in Beauty
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Caught on camera: Scientists and fishermen team up to film seals in fishing nets

Fishery bycatch—the accidental entanglement or capture in nets of animals that are not the intended target fish—is a leading cause of injury and death of seals and other marine mammals. Conversely, depredation—the eating of fish from nets by marine predators such as seals—can ruin a commercial fishing catch and cause expensive damage to nets and other fishing gear. For the first time, the team has been able to capture underwater video of gillnet fishing in the Northeast U.S., catching seals, spiny dogfish, and other predators on camera as they approach and enter the nets. To film depredation in action, Bocconcelli and the team attached an array of five underwater cameras across the top or “headrope” of a gillnet. The team has collected close to 100 hours of video footage, which is still being analyzed.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Cave Point, Door County, WI, USA by Daniel Anderson

Picture StoryI am fortunate to live in Wisconsin at the tip of an 80 mile long peninsula that extends out into Lake Michigan. There are wonderful photographic opportunities in every season but my favorite time is winter. That does not mean that it is always easy or pleasant to photograph at this time and this image is a perfect example of that. Time of the day is important here and since this area faces east, sunrise is the obvious most optimal time to be here. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Nature
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Colorado River, Moab, Utah, USA by Bruce Hucko

Picture StoryThe high desert of the Colorado Plateau experiences all seasons, and nothing, to me, validates how cold it can get as when the Colorado River freezes over. I mean bank to bank and almost thick enough to walk across (but don't try it). When conditions are right it usually takes a few weeks of prolonged cold for the ice to form. From my vantage point the side of the highway I looked down to see full ice, broken in a few places, yet still frozen bank to bank. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Cinque Terre and Tuscany Photo Workshop Oct 2020

During our Cinque Terre and Tuscany Photography Workshop, together we will photograph the picturesque villages and the rough seascapes of Cinque Terre as well as Tuscany’s serene rolling hills and medieval towns. Add in the great food and the Italian lifestyle and you are in for a truly unforgettable Workshop! During these 7 days of Cinque Terre and Tuscany Photography Workshop we will have over 25 locations available to photograph to bring your vision to life. During our Cinque Terre and Tuscany Photography Workshop, we will photograph every day, including the first and last day of the trip. My Cinque Terre and Tuscany Photography Workshop is open to everyone, from beginners to professionals.
Posted in Nature
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Costa Rica Photography Adventure Jan 2021

Join us in Costa Rica for a photographic adventure that will take you into several ecosystems in search of outstanding photographic opportunities. You can expect to return with quality images of many kinds of birds including toucans, aracaris, tanagers, honeycreepers, kiskadees, orioles, many kinds of herons and egrets, kingfishers, cormorants, anhingas, woodpeckers, parrots, macaws and, of course, several kinds of hummingbirds. This is a great tour to work on your photographic skills including birds in flight, low light and LED/flash assisted, macro and managing depth of field on close-ups. We will help you grow your skills and send you home with both great memories and a wealth of images to work and share. Please see our COVID-19 Response and Offer on the Directory Company Page for Nature Photography Adventures
Posted in Best of
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Could Listening to the Deep Sea Help Save It?

You might know what a hydrothermal vent looks like: black plumes billowing from deep-sea pillars encrusted with hobnobbing tubeworms, hairy crabs, pouting fish. But do you know what a hydrothermal vent sounds like? To the trained ear, the Suiyo vent sounds like many things. He has listened to the sea since 2008, and to the deep sea since 2018. He published these recordings in August at a conference of the Deep-Sea Biology Society.
Posted in Incredible
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Convergence Accelerator could help to meet “An Ocean of Need”

NSF’s goal in supporting the workshop was to “refine and develop a topic for a future Convergence Accelerator track” that can hasten convergence research between academia, industry, government agencies, foundations, and others, she said. De Menocal called the Convergence Accelerator one of the most exciting initiatives at NSF. “We need to transform ocean and climate science to produce the kind of knowledge we need,” de Menocal said, highlighting one key challenge. The Convergence Accelerator “is tailor-made for the geosciences and ocean sciences in particular,” adds Richard Murray, WHOI deputy director and vice president for research. “Without convergence, you’re not going to get very far in ocean research,” says Murray, who served as director of NSF’s Division of Ocean Sciences from 2015 to 2018.
Posted in Best of
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Crater Lake, Klamath County, Oregon, USA by Gary Weyandt

Picture StoryWhile taking a short hike on the Discovery Point Trail at Crater Lake National Park, reflections in the water provided the perfect opportunity to capture the majesty of the park in winter. The glassy water reflected the island, crater rim, and sky like a mirror. The edge of a snow drift helped frame the scene, clearly announcing this was winter. Crater Lake is magical in winter when the park is nearly deserted. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Nature
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Curious Clouds in the Transantarctic Mountains

On December 29, 2020, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 acquired these images of soft-edged clouds hovering over the Eisenhower Range of Antarctica’s Transantarctic Mountains. The clouds have the hallmarks of lenticular clouds that can form along the crests of mountain waves. In the United States, lenticular clouds are particularly common around the Rocky Mountains. This natural-color image has been enhanced with infrared light to separate the white clouds from the white snow and ice below. Still, a few people have witnessed lenticular clouds in Antarctica firsthand.
Posted in Best of
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Dangerous Hurricane Iota Sets Late-Season Records

Less than two weeks after being hit by category 4 Hurricane Eta, several Central American countries braced for the arrival of category 5 Hurricane Iota. Iota is the strongest hurricane and 30th named storm of the 2020 Atlantic season, the most since modern record-keeping began. Iota is the 13th storm to reach hurricane strength this year; the average hurricane year brings 11.5 named storms and six hurricanes. The satellite is operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which includes the National Hurricane Center. Tropical storm Iota reached hurricane strength early on November 15.
Posted in Beauty
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Data Security Tips from Engaging Networks

At Engaging Networks, we take data security very seriously and are always monitoring and adapting to changing legal requirements and potential threats. That’s why we’ve drafted this short blog, to share some tips on data protection that you can apply for your own data sets. Use Egnyte to share secure data. If you need to share data with our support team, or other members of your team use Egnyte. If you’re doing other things to help secure your data on Engaging Networks (or another platform), let us know!
Posted in Beauty
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Deep Creek, Idaho, USA by Nancy Russell

Picture StoryOne of my favorite places to photograph close to home is at the Kootenai National Wildlife Refuge in northern Idaho. This December day was cold and foggy and the trees on the mountains were covered with a fresh snow fall. I was hiking along Deep Creek and photographing many different scenes with wide angle and zoom lenses. I came upon these two trees with snow on the bark and then noticed the distant scene. I felt like I was looking through a window into Deep Creek and the Selkirk Mountains in the background.
Posted in Beauty
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Deciphering the Impacts of a Changing Ocean on Scallop Fisheries

The current scallop management program rotates access for scallop fishers between open and closed areas. When resource managers detect high abundances of small scallops in an area, that area can be closed to fishing to allow the scallops to grow larger. It is also critical to be able to use these changes in environmental conditions as predictors of scallop fishers’ behavior, such as choice of fishing routes and harvest locations. To better understand the socioeconomic impacts of a changing ocean on the sea scallop industry, WHOI biologist Rubao Ji and colleagues, in collaboration with scientists from NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service and UMass Dartmouth, used new data on scallop catches and scallop spatial distributions (stocks) to model the relationship between catch per unit effort and scallop stocks. Together, this suite of models will enable managers to assess fishing community vulnerability under climate change, with important policy implications for the area management program.
Posted in Beauty
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Dorset Jurassic Coast Photo Workshop Nov 2020

During this Dorset Jurassic Coast Photography Workshop you will discover and photograph in a new and personal way Dorset’s most iconic locations. During these 6 days of Dorset Jurassic Coast Photography Workshop we will have over 20 locations available to photograph to bring your vision to life. During our Dorset Photography Workshop we will photograph every day, including the first and last day of the trip. During our Dorset Jurassic Coast Photography Workshop we will do daily image review sessions, allowing me to help you create a strong, consistent portfolio as well as to give you my technical and artistic tips for our next sessions in the field. My Dorset Jurassic Coast Photography Workshop is open to everyone, from beginners to professionals.
Posted in Incredible
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Eagle River, Alaska, USA by Ray Bulson

A favorite atmospheric phenomenon of mine is called the Belt of Venus. The Belt of Venus is more pronounced during the winter months. Living in the subarctic region of Alaska, I have observed that the color of the band intensifies as the temperature drops. The pink of the Belt of Venus is a beautiful, rich magenta which contrasts nicely with the dark green spruce. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Incredible
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Drones, Scat, and the Joys of Marine Mammal Fieldwork in Alaska

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Beauty
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East Troublesome Fire Spreads to the Rockies

Within ten days, the East Troublesome fire had burned through more than 190,000 acres (77,000 hectares) and had become Colorado’s second largest fire (by area) on record. East Troublesome experienced extensive growth on October 21, growing from 30,000 acres to 170,000 acres in about 24 hours. On October 22, 2020, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 captured these natural-color (left) and false-color (right) images of the East Troublesome fire. The snow also slowed the Cameron Peak fire, located about 10 miles north of East Troublesome. U.S. Forest Service officials estimate East Troublesome and Cameron Peak will be fully contained by early November.
Posted in Nature
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Ecuador Birds Photography Adventure June 2021

Ecuador, a land mass the size of Colorado, hosts 1 out of every 5 bird species on the planet making it the 4th highest nation on earth for bird diversity. What is new is the partnership between small landowners and conservation that has protected habitat and yields an incredible opportunity to see and photograph a huge variety of birds in conditions that enable great photographic art! We have also included a session of multi-flash hummingbird photography. We could go on and on gushing about all that you can see and photograph but space is limited here, click the sidebar button to see many more images and learn about this exciting photography adventure! Pricing$5900 Double Occupancy, $6500 Single OccupancyPlease see our COVID-19 Response and Offer on the Directory Company Page for Nature Photography Adventures
Posted in Nature
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Elgol, Isle of Skye, Scotland by Ken Rennie

Picture StoryI was hoping for either a stormy evening or a spectacular sunset but neither happened. So it was a 10 stop filter and see what a long exposure would bring. I couldn't get an image so I just stood and watched entranced by their beautiful presence. Hey VisitorDid you know that now we offer a VIP membership? Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Nature
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Endangered right whales population at about 413, expert reports in update

The largest cause of death for right whales is entanglement in fishing gear, followed by other means of human interference, such as boat strikes. NEW SMYRNA BEACH — Not even halfway through the calving season for North Atlantic right whales, there’s already been some major ups and downs. Julie Albert, right whale coordinator for the Marine Resources Council, gave an update Thursday night on the calving season. Even with four calves birthed this season so far, there are only about 413 North Atlantic right whales left in existence. "If we didn’t have our volunteer network helping us, we wouldn’t know a lot about what we do about right whales," Albert said.
Posted in Beauty
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Experts Explore the Ocean-Human Health Link – Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Eleonora Van SitterenGuest Student, Lindell LabI work with the Lindell Lab group at WHOI on a selective breeding program with sugar kelps. These can be used as a carbon-neutral, sometimes even carbon-negative, highly nutritious food source, as well as a promising biofuel. To make the farming process more efficient, the lab is tracking the genetics of the algae. But to farm kelp, you need something for it to attach to and grow on. So, my job is to figure out a better binder (glues, basically) that will help algae attach and allow them to grow.
Posted in Best of
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Faroe Islands Photo Tour July 2021

Remote, raw and remarkable, the Faroe Islands are an archipelago of 18 extinct volcanic islands on the edge of the world between Iceland, Scotland and Norway. Photography’s best kept secret and your playground for 7 daysKnown as the land of optical illusions, the Faroe Islands simply hypnotise your lens. We will give you the chance to tread your own path and introduce you to the real Faroe Islands. We will share a meal together and you will get the chance to ask questions about the Faroe Islands. Our Faroe Islands tour offers a slower pace, giving you the time to appreciate the moment without being rushed or feeling part of a herd on holiday.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Extreme Winter Weather Causes U.S. Blackouts

A potent arctic weather system chilled much of the United States with frigid weather in mid-February 2021, shattering low-temperature records in the middle of the country. The extreme cold combined with several snow and ice storms to leave millions of people without power. According to news reports, natural gas shortages were already limiting power generation across Texas prior to the mid-February storm. He noted that Texas is the only state that has isolated its power grid from the rest of the country. The map above provides a view of the extreme cold associated with the arctic air mass.
Posted in Eye Candy
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First Detailed Oil Sample Analysis Completed from Mauritius Oil Spill

“Fuel oils, are arguably the most challenging petroleum products to analyze and investigate following marine-based spills,” said Reddy. Although low, the levels of PAHs might accumulate in certain parts of the marine environment. These substances were present in minute amounts, but still detectable thanks to the technology available in the collaborating laboratories. WHOI’s pioneering discoveries stem from an ideal combination of science and engineering—one that has made it one of the most trusted and technically advanced leaders in basic and applied ocean research and exploration anywhere. We play a leading role in ocean observation, and operate the most extensive suite of data-gathering platforms in the world.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Five feet above a rising ocean

Adjacent to Water Street in Woods Hole there’s a small edifice that used to be a hangar for water planes in the 1960s. Because of that, it’s still precariously perched less than 5 feet above the water level, atop Dyer’s Dock. But in that time, deeper reaching king tides and stronger hurricanes have made him weary about future conditions in Woods Hole. Oceanus: You work just a few feet above the resting sea level in Woods Hole. Tell us about sea level rise from your unique vantage point.
Posted in Eye Candy
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For Mark Baumgartner, Whale Safe is the natural evolution of WHOI’s work with passive acoustics

His lab’s sound research has become the groundwork powering Whale Safe, a new mapping and analysis tool launched in September of 2020 that overlays whale and ship location data to reduce fatal collisions. We sat down with Baumgartner to discuss how passive acoustics studies have evolved over the years at WHOI, and how Whale Safe is a great way to utilize this research. How does your passive acoustics data help Whale Safe work? How will Whale Safe mitigate animal mortality from ship strikes? Whale Safe is a concept that hasn’t been tried anywhere before.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Free Feature • A Guide to Infrared Landscape Photography

Follow us Follow usDo you have a fascination with infrared photography but no idea about its ins and outs? Tim Shoebridge will guide you through the process of creating infrared masterpieces TIM SHOEBRIDGEI have always had a fascination with infrared photography for as long as I can remember. Such cameras are marketed as full spectrum conversions and you will need to fit an infrared filter to your lenses to capture infrared images. All the infrared images in this article were shot using a 720nm filter which is a common choice and considered ‘middle ground’ for infrared photography. There is a common phenomenon when shooting infrared images called infrared hotspots, which is where a central circle of light that is visibly higher in exposure appears on captured infrared images.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Free Feature • Landscape Photography as a Fine Art

Follow us Follow usThe case for landscape photography as a fine art is not a hard one to make. Photography as Fine ArtKnowing the history leading to current-day art and understanding what constitutes “fine art”, we see some challenges facing artistic landscape photography. Clearly, landscape photography is capable of meeting the criteria for being considered a fine art. To start with, many photographers self-apply established art terminology, such as “fine art”, without understanding fully what it means. The case for landscape photography as a fine art is not a hard one to make.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Free Feature • A Guide To Winter Landscape Photography

Follow us Follow usWith winter approaching fast on the upper hemisphere, landscape photographers are looking forward to getting out there and creating their masterpieces. Mark Bauer helped us put together the ultimate guide to winter landscape photography Mark BauerIf you asked non-photographers what their favourite season is, it is likely that few would say winter. Yet, a huge number of photographers name it as their favourite time of year for landscape photography. At its best, winter delivers a wealth of photographic opportunities, including frosty sunrises, colourful sunsets and dramatic, stormy skies. The weather in winter can be unpredictable to say the least, and it can be daunting heading out into the cold on a freezing winter morning.
Posted in Beauty
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Free Feature • On the Move During the Shutdown

My idea was to work on projects for several organizations at remote or very remote locations in southeastern California, Nevada and Utah. The idea was to provide a promotional diversion for those who could not personally experience attractive natural spaces during the shutdown. My subjects were varied, but I was able to follow the plan for imagery of remote natural landscapes in a variety of environments. Such conditions can make or break the chances for some good images. The advantages of being in remote locations have tradeoffs with some risks, but the risks, at least, were not those from an unseen malevolent disease.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Gold Mining in Russia’s Central Aldan Ore District

But in places such as the Central Aldan ore district in the Russian Far East—where concentrations of the precious metal have been discovered—mining operations are large enough to be seen from space. Central Aldan is one of Russia’s largest gold ore districts, with the mineral occurring in numerous deposits, or “lodes,” in the fractured rock. The Kuranakh gold deposit was discovered in 1947, and a moderate amount of gold was extracted by 1955. In areas where a lode has been eroded, pieces of gold can become concentrated by rivers and streams into placer deposits. From April to December in the 2019 mining season, three dredges extracted 18,600 ounces of gold from the Bolshoy Kuranakh placer deposit.
Posted in Beauty
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Frosty Morning, Welburn, England by Richard Burdon

We’d had a cold spell and the temperature had been below zero all week, but all my efforts to capture a winter scene had eluded me so far. This feeling of elation must be the same sort of emotion film workers experience when they see an image appear in their developing tray. I love the delicacy of the frost on the tree and the background just visible in the morning mist gives me that separation and simplicity I was looking for. Two hours after this shot was taken, it thawed and never froze again for the remainder of the year. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Nature
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From north to south pole, climate scientists grapple with pandemic disruptions

As the coronavirus pandemic rages around the world, another ongoing and dire crisis — climate change — has not abated. And researchers from the Arctic to the Antarctic have struggled to maintain their research while facing pandemic restrictions, travel limitations and redirected funding. “But I also wish we didn’t have a pandemic.”Even though the ship had to leave the ice, it did return and scientists were able to continue their important research. We’ve moved from the kind of ‘university on the ice’ to being more ‘robots on the ice’,” Isern said. He is feeling the pinch just like some climate researchers who will now have data gaps.
Posted in Nature
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Grain Burn, Penicuik, Midlothian, Scotland by John Brooks

Picture StoryI would not normally venture into Scotland during the winter months as I dont like cold weather and i dont ski. On this occasion however i needed to attend an important international conference and was even participating so no excuse would be accepted for my absence. When I skirted Penicuik and just before reaching "Grain Burn" to the right of the road i espied a frozen are of flooded field with a convenient parking layby immediately nearby. There was not much light and needed a wide aperture with slowish shutter speed and took care to avoid camera shake. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Nature
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Greater data access gives Northeast fishermen an edge against a warming ocean

One of those obstacles occurred last month, when warm water from the Gulf Stream seeped into fishing and lobstering grounds around Block Island. Together, the two have been engaged in a long-term data collection effort to track changes occurring over the continental shelf waters. DANIEL: Normally, Ellertson hears about these warm core rings from Glen. We give fishermen access to the data always, so they have ownership of the data. DANIEL: Gawarkiewicz says this bodes well for adaptation in New England’s fisheries, at a time when warming seas will likely mean more frequent warm core rings, something he says is already evident in historical data.
Posted in Nature
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Half Dome, Yosemite, California, USA by Fereshte Faustini

Picture StoryOne calm, crisp cold morning, I found myself basking in the quiet of Yosemite Valley. I had been in Yosemite National Park for a few days to take advantage of the Sierra winter storm for some moodier photography opportunities. The scene before me was wondrous: Yosemite's majestic Half Dome, peeking through the snow-covered valley, completely sun-kissed, golden, and luminous, reflecting gently on the half-frozen water below. This is why Yosemite continues to be one of the most incredible National Parks. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Beauty
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Guilin, Xiapu and Great Wall in China Photo Tour May 2021

This tour will start from the top of the jagged mountains in Guilin to the wild Great Wall. The tour will cover some of the best vantage points for sunrise and sunset that are off the beaten track, far away from maddening crowds. Although the Great Wall spans over 20000km, there are not many places that one can shoot sunrise or sunset as their access are confined to daylight hours only. Witnessing and shooting the sunrise on top of the wall is truly a surreal experience. For fine art and cultural photography, Xiapu mudflats will offer us boundless opportunities.
Posted in Beauty
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Haukland Beach, Lofoten Islands, Norway by David DesRochers

Picture StoryTraveling to a winter destination always carries the risk of an extreme weather event interfering with travel plans. My flight canceled, my only option was to board a ferry that was scheduled to stop in Leknes. My four-hour journey turned into 6 hours before I arrived at Svolvær where I found shelter for the night. I arrived in Leknes the next day where the snow was measured, not in inches but in feet. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Beauty
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‘High-octane’ hurricane fuel swirls in the Gulf of Mexico

An already warm Gulf of Mexico will once again be heating up this summer thanks to one of the Atlantic Ocean’s fastest and warmest currents—the Loop Current—which carries warm water from the Caribbean Sea up past the western tip of Cuba and into the Gulf. There, huge swirling rings of deep warm water the size of Maine will break off from the primary current and wander westward through the Gulf, providing a potent heat source that could cause hurricanes travelling overhead to rapidly intensify. “I’ve heard these ring-shaped eddies—and the Loop Current from which they detach—described as ‘high-octane fuel’ for hurricanes,” says Heather Furey, a research specialist at WHOI. “Where the rings are in relation to the path of a hurricane can have a significant effect on the storm’s intensity.”Hurricane Rita in 2005 is a case in point. Before slamming into the Gulf Coast that year, the storm passed directly over one of the Loop Current's eddies, which caused it to explode into a monster Category 5 hurricane before making landfall.
Posted in Incredible
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Hocking Hills State Park, Ohio, USA by Roy Goldsberry

Picture StoryI have been to visit Hocking Hills State Park near Logan, Ohio several times. There are several, separated areas that make up the park, and we decided to start with Old Mans Cave the next morning. That had us starting at the upper falls end, and then following the stream past the cave and on to the lower falls. Many pathways and stairs were fully covered by ice, and we had ice cleats for our boots. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Incredible
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Hot ocean waters along East Coast are drawing in ‘weird’ fish and supercharging hurricane season

Scientists studying the warming waters in the region say it is part of a pattern and an ominous signal of climate change. A marine heat waveMuch of the Eastern Seaboard, from the Georgia coast to southern Maine, is in the midst of what scientists define as a marine heat wave. Due to human-caused buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, marine heat waves have increased dramatically in frequency, size and severity in recent decades. Shark tagging data show a “well-established summer presence” of the species off the Maine coast, he said via email. Gawarkiewicz identified the warmer-than-normal water temperatures south of Cape Hatteras as an area of particular concern.
Posted in Incredible
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Hunger in the Arctic prompts focus on causes, not symptoms

As part of the field work, Kourantidou looked at factors that have been choking off the communities’ access to fishing grounds. This includes a lack of harvesting rights and resources to work the local fisheries (e.g. The region’s colonial legacy often thwarts the current generation’s ability to capture the social and economic benefits of their adjacent marine resources. “But today, the Labrador Inuit feel way less empowered, owing to marine resource governance challenges and lack of sovereignty and control in managing marine resources. The hardships of living in this Arctic region are clear, and have prompted some short-term strategies to improve access to nutritious, protein-rich food.
Posted in Nature
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How Long Does Plastic Persist in the Ocean?

The numbers are staggering: as many as 8 million tons of plastic end up in the ocean every year. Exacerbating concerns for ocean life and human health is the perception that plastics last indefinitely in the environment. Different formulations behave differently in the environment, which means different plastics break down in the ocean at different rates. For example, many plastic additives react chemically to light, leading plastics with additives to degrade more quickly in sunlight. These experiments will provide the first realistic, verifiable estimates of the lifetime of plastic goods in the environment—a critical step towards quantifying the risks associated with plastic pollution.
Posted in Nature
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How WHOI scientists once looked for the lost city of Atlantis

That city, known today as the fabled lost continent of Atlantis, has gripped the human imagination ever since. It would only be fitting that when a new oceanographic institution began 90 years ago in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, it would have the drive and research capacity to investigate whether this city actually existed. It was 1931, soon after the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s inception, when the field of ocean science was still relatively new. But after more than a month at sea and their other research projects were completed, the crew returned home empty-handed. No mention of any new findings regarding Atlantis can be found in their logbooks.
Posted in Incredible
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Hurricane Zeta Arrives on the Gulf Coast

For the fifth time this year, a named tropical storm or hurricane is going to make landfall in Louisiana. A natural-color image of Hurricane Zeta (above) was acquired in the late morning on October 28, 2020, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite. It was the third time in a month that the Yucatan was hit by a tropical storm or hurricane. Zeta is the 27th named tropical storm of the 2020 Atlantic season and the 11th hurricane. The record is 28 named storms and 15 hurricanes, set in 2005.
Posted in Best of
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Iceberg Closes In on South Georgia

Antarctic iceberg A-68A has drifted menacingly close to South Georgia, a remote island in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Klaus Strübing, a scientist with the International Ice Charting Group (IICWG), thinks the iceberg might already be grounded. He reported that as of December 13, part of the iceberg was in waters just 76 meters deep. History has shown that icebergs travel complex paths on their drift northward from the Southern Ocean into the warmer waters of the South Atlantic. In 2004, that iceberg stalled for several months in a similar location as A-68A before ultimately drifting around the island.
Posted in Best of
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Iceberg A-68A Nears South Georgia

“Most just don’t survive the journey from the Weddell to South Georgia,” Long said. The map below shows the path of A-68A, based on data from the Antarctic Iceberg Tracking Database. “The recent news about it seems to be expecting that it will ground at South Georgia. I’m not so sure.”Long agrees, noting that historical precedent suggests the iceberg is likely to pass just south of South Georgia. “If, however, it passes far enough to the south, it will miss the counter current the vortex and probably keep heading east-northeast.”Whether it becomes stuck or sails smoothly on by, Iceberg A-68A will eventually move past South Georgia.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Icefields Parkway Photo Tour Sep 2021

The Icefields Parkway is considered one of the most delightful highways in the world. However, wayward Canadians do not agree with this opinion at all and consider this route the most beautiful ever. The variety of fantastic landscapes and the purest intoxicating mountain air will take your breath away. The route will cover three national parks: Jasper, Yoho and Banff. We are going to travel on a relatively small area of these parks, in the Rocky Mountains, for 14 days, discovering the most wonderful season – the Indian summer.
Posted in Incredible
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Investigating the ocean’s influence on Australia’s drought

Caroline Ummenhofer, a physical oceanographer at WHOI, studies how ocean patterns in the Indian Ocean influence rainfall and extreme events—such as droughts and floods—on adjacent landmasses. “The Indian Ocean is a key driver of Australian rainfall variability,” says Ummenhofer. A record Indian Ocean dipole event occurred during the second half of 2019, during which stronger monsoon winds in the eastern Indian Ocean pushed warm waters to the western Indian Ocean. When it comes to Australian dry spells, however, the Indian Ocean typically does not act in isolation. “When the effects of several of these climate phenomena occur simultaneously, extreme weather and climate conditions are often the result,” Ummenhofer says.
Posted in Incredible
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Jasper NP, Alberta, Canada by Larry Day

Picture StoryTrudging through heavy snow in the mountains, I had expected to come across some stunning wide vista. Instead, the heavy fresh snow had made unique images throughout the fallen trees. I reminded myself as I trudged on that the beautiful nature I was in was home to much more than people visiting National Parks. Hey VisitorDid you know that now we offer a VIP membership? Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
Posted in Beauty
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Katmai Alaska Bears Photo Adventure July 2022

Bears, which are normally solitary creatures, gather to feast on this momentary pause. We will find mothers with cubs and we will watch as bears showcase a number of unique styles of fishing. This program is built around five days of flying in small float planes to meet up with the current collection of bears deep in Alaska’s Katmai Peninsula. But, we will also have opportunities to photograph bears catching jumping salmon at Brooks Falls. Cost$9,990 Double Occupancy; $11,490, Single OccupancyGroup Size7 participants or five rooms, whichever comes first.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Keilvatnet, Lofoten Islands, Norway by Michael Thomas

Picture StoryIn the winter of 2018, my wife and I spent a week in Reine and Leknes before visiting Iceland. We had to fly to Reykjavik, then to Oslo, to Bodo, stay overnight there, before finally flying to Leknes. On our way to investigate Eggum Beach, 20 or so km north of Leknes, we drove past Keilvatnet. It was solidly frozen over, so I carefully went out a bit to look for some interesting angles or foreground. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Best of
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Kenya Photography Safari Sep 2021

Kenya is famous to photographers for four things: Diversity, Species Protection, Masai Mara and Amboseli. This photographic safari is designed to deliver the first three - and with the extension, Amboseli. It is timed to coincide with the Crossing of the Mara River by the Great Migration of wildebeest and zebras. It delivers 3 kinds of giraffes, both kinds of rhinos in ways that support dramatic photography, and chimpanzees. We will be there helping you make great photographic decisions - with excellent guides to help you understand what you are seeing.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Krafla, Myvatn, Reykjahlid, Iceland by Dominiek Cottem

Picture StoryThe geothermal area of Krafla seen from the edge of the Viti crater (North East of Iceland). Outside of expectations, it already started to snow in the north-east of the country at the end of September. A combination of frozen snow and the ice made it a surprisingly tough hike on very slippery slopes. The ever-changing light in Iceland is one of the elements that make this country so unique for landscape photographers. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
Posted in Nature
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Is seaweed the future of fuel?

For its part, the company has trialled small-scale seaweed farms in Denmark, France, Scotland, Sweden, Morocco, Indonesia, Sri Lanka and more. As Martínez highlights, AtSeaNova’s substrates are critical, but are just one part of its ‘turnkey’ seaweed farms. However, instead of bringing the nutrients to the seaweed, this company is taking the seaweed – in this case, giant kelp – to the nutrients. Given this, Fischell and colleagues have been developing autonomous underwater observation systems for monitoring large-scale seaweed farms with minimal human intervention. To cater for future seaweed farms, both Snoopy and Darter have had facelifts.
Posted in Incredible
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Kluane National Park, Yukon, Canada by Atanu Bandyopadhyay

Picture Story"Staircase Icefall and Consolation Creek". Why Staircase Icefall ? Above each staircase, there is a layer of thin ice and calm water reflecting the beauty of the mountain. Due to lack of my knowledge with such formation, I chose to call it Staircase Icefall. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Nature
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Kubota Garden, Seattle, WA, USA by Joe Campisi

Picture StoryKubota Garden is a beautiful Japanese garden located in Seattle. It's a beautiful place to visit anytime of the year, especially stunning in the fall. But maybe the most special time to visit is when a rare Seattle snowfall blankets the garden. I've always wanted to visit and photograph the garden in snow since I saw an image in a book about Seattle over a decade ago. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Lake Neusiedl, Austria by Peter Richter

It was taken near Podersdorf on the shore of Lake Neusiedl, a steppe lake in the eastern part of Austria, close to the Hungarian border. After a period of heavy frost the whole lake was frozen. On this day we had minus 10 degrees Celsius and an icy wind from north-west which made for rather inhospitable weather conditions. In summer, this place is a popular recreational area, well known for windsurfing and stand up paddling. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Nature
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Lago di Antorno, Dolomites, Italy by Alexander Sinadinoski

Picture StoryThis year I spent countless weekends in South Tyrol to photographically document the beauty of the landscape. I am magically attracted by the tops of the Dolomites which meander through this beautiful part of Italy. Every sight of these natural wonders leaves me speechless, for me one of the landscape photography hotspots of this world. This Spot, called Lago di Antorno, which is easily accessible by car, so there are always a lot of people there. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Lake Superior, Hovland, MN, USA by Stephanie Drew

Picture StoryHovland, MN is about 20 miles from the Canadian border on Lake Superior. On this morning, the temperature was -10 with a windchill of -35. In order to get to this location, I hiked 10 minutes through the woods with ice cleats until I entered this clearing on the shoreline. The sky was cloudy but as the sun rose over the horizon, the sky turned into an unexpected pastel painting. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Nature
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LEE Filters Launches the LEE85 Filter System

Follow us Follow usLEE Filters, a leading manufacturer of high-quality lighting, photographic and cine filters, are introducing the LEE85 Filter System. The LEE85 Filter System shares the same intuitive design features and benefits as the popular LEE100 Filter System, which launched in 2019 for DSLRs and medium- and large-format cameras. Included with each LEE85 Kit is the LEE85 System Pouch, which holds a LEE85 Filter Holder, Polariser, and filters; the Pouch features a concertina design with one slot per filter, and it comes with strap options for over-the-shoulder, belt-loop, and tripod configurations. “The launch of LEE85 is a natural evolution of the next generation of LEE Filters systems, which introduce a new set of experiences for using filters faster and more intuitively on compact system cameras,” says Gerald Smith, Engineering Manager, LEE Filters. For more information about the LEE85 Filter System, visit www.leefilters.com/LEE85
Posted in Incredible
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Lighting the Edge of the Roof

A sharp contrast in nighttime light density distinguishes the sparsely populated Tibetan Plateau—the “Roof of the World”—from the fertile and densely inhabited Indo-Gangetic plain of Northern India and Pakistan. These regions are not only visually distinct from an astronaut’s view; they are physically separated by the Himalayan mountain range. South of the Himalayas, the cities of New Delhi, India, and Lahore, Pakistan, stand out among the network of cities on the plain. On the other side of the Himalayas, tectonic forces have worked for about 50 million years to elevate the Tibetan plateau to an average of 4500 meters (14,764 feet) above sea level. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA/JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.
Posted in Beauty
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Large, Deep Antarctic Ozone Hole in 2020

Persistent cold temperatures and strong circumpolar winds supported the formation of a large and deep Antarctic ozone hole in 2020, and it is likely to persist into November, NOAA and NASA scientists reported. On September 20, 2020, the annual ozone hole reached its peak area at 24.8 million square kilometers (9.6 million square miles), roughly three times the size of the continental United States. Last year’s ozone hole was the smallest since the early 1980s, growing to 16.4 million square kilometers (6.3 million square miles) in early September. During recent years with normal weather conditions, the ozone hole has typically grown to a maximum of 20 million square kilometers (8 million square miles). In addition to the area of the ozone hole, scientists also track the average amount of ozone depletion—how little is left inside the hole.
Posted in Nature
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Long Valley, Idaho, USA by Shane Davila

As I drove along a road in the country side I spied these willows all alone in the distance. I need to look harder but not necessarily with my eyes but instead with my vision. Recognizing these elements as components to my vision the scene called to me, urging me to find it. It is often the simplest of things that can speak with the loudest voice as this simple scene did to me. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
Posted in Nature
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Latest Assignment • WIN $100 cash with LEE Filters

This time, however, I strategized to create a bit of interest into that 1939 (or so) relic that the Bleakney’s left there for some obscure reason. I arrived from Portland on a Sunday afternoon filled with sunshine, photographers and guest. When the light started to really get good, the breeze kicked up and so I bump the ISO to 3200. I am a big believer in Tony Kuyper’s Luminosity Mask. In this image I mildly applied his Smart Orton effect, to give the yellow of the balsamroot a nice glow.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Longyearbyen, Svalbard, Norway by Cezary Morga

Picture StoryLongyearbyen, located about a thousand kilometers from the North Pole, is a former mining town and the Svalbard archipelago's biggest city. I took this picture in January 2020, right before the COVID essentially shut down travel. I remember that it was frigidly cold back then because of the tireless gusts of wind blowing the snow in my face. All the seasons offer different attractions, from Aurora Borealis spectacles, snowy twilight vistas through polar summer ideal for some wildlife photography. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Incredible
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Lamar Valley, Yellowstone NP, USA by Bruce Costa

The crowds have dwindled, the landscape is covered in snow, and the animals are typically down from the park's higher elevations. Entering through the north gate via Gardiner, Montana, Lamar Valley is one of the few places in the park you can access with a private vehicle; the rest of the park is only accessible via snow coach. Even with COVID restrictions in place, the park was still seeing a fair number of visitors. I figured the Lamar Valley and the Lamar River, in particular, would be a perfect place to test out this unique feature of this field camera. The Lamar River flows east to west in the valley and typically is snow-covered in the winter.
Posted in Nature
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Mara Crossing Photography Safari Sep 2021

When the Great Migration of wildebeest and zebras swings north it encounters the fabled Mara River - and pandemonium begins. Huge collections of wildebeest and zebras gather on the edges of the river, then suddenly plunge in a chaotic crossing. We have designed a safari focused on getting you to the crossing and keeping you in range to maximize your opportunities to make those heart stopping images. And, when the action has paused, we have great opportunities for a full range of predators and prey nearby! We will be there capturing images alongside you, but our first priority will be all about you getting great images.
Posted in Incredible
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Loo, Gelderland, Netherlands by Ronnie Brinkhuis

Picture StoryI was on my way to a beautiful house in our area to capture it on photo, when I suddenly came face to face with this beautiful tree, the tree stands along a dike in the province of Gelderland in the Netherlands. Due to the many melt water high in the mountains of the Alps, the water in the rivers of the Netherlands was higher than normal and this tree was therefore in the water. Because it had also snowed in the Netherlands it looked all in all wintry and I thought it was time to take my nikon out of the bag and take this picture. Snow can no longer be taken for granted in the Netherlands, so this photo is a beautiful reminder of a beautiful winter in our small country. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Mastbos, Breda, The Netherlands by Fabrizio Micciche

A winter scene with a deer in the middle of the frame looking at me. It was the second day of snow in The Netherlands and took my chances to capture some shot while snowing early morning. I decided to go deeper into the woods hoping some wind shielding offered by the tall trees. I couldn't wish for a better winter shot! Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Best of
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Looks Like Japan Is Going Ahead With Plan to Dump Radioactive Fukushima Water Into the Ocean

In this case, it’s 170 tons of radioactive waste water each and every day. The debate on what to do with all this contaminated water has been raging for the past seven years. At the same time, Rafael Grossi, the director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency, has gone on record saying the TEPCO plan meets global standards. Hiroshi Kishi, president of JF Zengyoren—a fisheries cooperative—has expressed his opposition to the TEPCO plan. Advertisement“We are dead against a release of contaminated water to the ocean as it could have a catastrophic impact on the future of Japan’s fishing industry,” said Kishi during a recent meeting with government officials.
Posted in Incredible
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Lake Tanuki, Shizuoka, Japan by Francis Ansing

Follow us Follow usPicture StoryThis image was taken in Lake Tanuki, Shizuoka, Japan. I borrowed a car from my Japanese-Portuguese friend in Tokyo to tour around my friends and take photos. It was day 2 of our tour and we were in Lake Tanuki when the car suddenly breakdown. I called my friend in Tokyo to tell about the car and he said he was coming down to Shizuoka for a replacement. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
Posted in Beauty
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Meet the Alvin 6500 Team: Lane Abrams

In 1991, Abrams was working as an electrical engineer at Bell Labs in New Jersey, when he saw a help wanted ad in the Boston Globe for the Alvin Group at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Abrams’ group reconfigured the electrical systems during the last overhaul, anticipating that the group was set to extend its range from 4,500 to 6,500 meters. This is the second interview in a multi-part series with members of the Alvin Group. Oceanus: What do you do for the Alvin Group? We’ve purposely built Alvin so that the electrical system is a small part of what is required to keep people safe.
Posted in Best of
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Microplastics research gets critical private funding

Despite regular media coverage and international concern over microplastics in the ocean, funding to study this emerging ocean pollutant has been surprisingly scarce. Early microplastics research by WHOI scientists was mostly funded through small grants that allowed them to explore very limited facets of the issue. In 2017 and 2018, WHOI awarded Catalyst Funds—an incubator program funded by private donations—to form the Marine Microplastics Initiative. “Currently, there are many more questions than answers about the fate and impacts of microplastics in the ocean,” he says. “The growing support from private foundations is critical in enabling the interdisciplinary, cutting-edge research that is needed to understand and solve this global problem.”
Posted in Beauty
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Mining for Iron at Mount Whaleback

The image above shows the Mount Whaleback Iron Ore Mine, adjacent to the mining town of Newman. Searching in the Ophthalmia Range, he climbed up a hill and stumbled upon a massive iron ore deposit that soon became Mount Whaleback iron ore mine. Hilditch tried to open Mount Whaleback for business in 1961, after Australia lifted an embargo on exporting mineral goods. The satellite image above also shows several smaller mines nearby; the smaller mines and Mount Whaleback are now collectively known as Mount Newman. A lot of the iron ore found at Mount Whaleback is hematite, which has been the dominant iron ore mined in Australia since the 1960s.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Mystical Egypt Photo Tour April 2021

This immersive historical, cultural and photographic tour with McKay Photography Academy takes you on a journey into Ancient Egypt where you will experience a unique modern age mixed with the ancient old in a culture unlike anywhere else in the world. Guests with all levels of photographic experience, beginner through advanced are welcome! This tour will have an incredible 14 client / 3 instructor ratio and even if you are brand new to photography, there is NO NEED to feel intimidated on joining us! • Tour of Philae Temple and High Dam of Aswan• Disembark in Aswan• Softel Legend Old Cataract Hotel – One of the top hotels in the world! • Optional temple tours, museum tours, or relaxing by the pool• Flight from Aswan to Cairo Included
Posted in Incredible
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Mauritius oil spill: Don't assume the worst

(CNN) Few sights prompt such dispiriting gut punches as an oil spill casting a blackened pall on pristine waters, beaches, and wildlife. I'm a scientist who has studied oil spills all over the world for more than three decades, including the Deepwater Horizon disaster in 2010. I've learned that the way an oil spill unfolds is not always simple or straightforward, and the worst-case scenario isn't a fait accompli. The Deepwater Horizon oil spill spread some 160 million gallons of crude oil along more than 1,300 miles of coastline. Despite our efforts, of course, there are lingering environmental impacts from Deepwater Horizon and many uncertainties about long-term effects.
Posted in Best of
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NASA funds ambitious WHOI-led research of extreme sea-level events

A new WHOI-led research initiative will receive $1.5 million from NASA to investigate the role of various processes behind extreme sea-level events that lead to coastal high-tide flooding around the world. “The frequency of high-tide flooding events occurring around the U.S. and worldwide is rapidly accelerating,” says WHOI physical oceanographer Chris Piecuch. Traditionally, such events can be observed by NOAA tidal gauges, which make on-the-minute measurements of coastal sea level. That's where NASA satellites come in. Sea-level satellites orbiting the planet every 10 days can generate a global snapshot of the state of sea level over the entire ocean.
Posted in Best of
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MPB launches first-ever Photo and Video Kit Hall of Fame

Follow us Follow usPublic Voting Opens for Hall of Fame Honouring Photography GearMPB launches first-ever Photo and Video Kit Hall of Fame and announces nomineesPublic voting is now open for the 2020 Inaugural Class of the Photo and Video Kit Hall of Fame. MPB, the world’s largest resale platform for digital photography and filmmaking kit, has launched the Photo and Video Kit Hall of Fame to honour the best photo and video equipment of the digital era. The camera experts at MPB chose the nominees based on their qualities, embodying the spirit of each category. “Being able to handle this range and calibre of kit week in and week out, we’re honoured to be launching the Photo and Video Kit Hall of Fame,” said Matt Barker, CEO and Founder of MPB. MPB will announce the Photo and Video Kit Hall of Fame’s inaugural 2020 class on World Photography Day – 19 August 2020 – and will award plaques to the manufacturers of the winning kit.
Posted in Eye Candy
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New $69 Ranger DSLR Mini Sling for Cameras from HEX

As a streamlined solution for “on-the-go” shooters, the $69 Ranger DSLR Mini Sling is even more compact than their popular $99 Ranger DSLR Sling, which it otherwise mimics. The new $69 HEX Mini Sling for a DSLR and accessories joins several camera bag and case models that feature the modern urban designs of HEX Brand. The affordable new $69 HEX Brand HEX Mini DSLR Sling bag for a single camera or accessories. Sized at 2.5 liters, the HEX Mini DSLR Sling is capable of holding a single DSLR, a few lenses or Vlogging kits and peripherals. The HEX Ranger Mini DSLR Sling will hold a single camera and lens or accessories.
Posted in Best of
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Nereid Under Ice explores Aurora hydrothermal vent field

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Beauty
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New Fires Scorch the Hills of Southern California

But as global temperatures have risen, so too has the state’s risk for fall season fires. These images show late-autumn fires burning southeast of Los Angeles, alongside the scars of fires from earlier this year. In that timespan, the Blue Ridge fire burned 13,964 acres near the currently active Airport fire, and the Silverado fire burned 12,466 acres near the currently active Bond Fire. Despite the previous fires, enough brush and vegetation remains nearby to fuel the new fires. Cal Fire reported that fires have scorched more than 1.4 million acres in California since the beginning of the year.
Posted in Beauty
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Nikon Announces D780 Full-Frame DSLR, P950 CoolPix and New Telephotos

“It feels like a D750 but looks like a D850,” Nikon explained during a pre-briefing on the new new full-frame $2,299 Nikon D780 DSLR. Building on the similar Nikon D750, the Nikon D780 removes the internal flash. For the first time in a Nikon Lens, the SR Shortwave Reduction element will address chromatic aberrations found below the blue spectrum to address problems like purple fringing. Combining internal lens stabilizations with in-camera body stabilization, the lens can provide up to five stops of shake reduction. Updating their most popular non-interchangeable camera from the P900, the $799 Nikon CoolPix P950 has the same 16-megapixel 1/2.3” sensor and 83x zoom lens with 24-2000mm equivalence.
Posted in Eye Candy
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New observation network will provide unprecedented, long-term view of life in the ocean twilight zone

All of these components will connect to the network’s buoys using acoustic signals underwater and an Iridium satellite link at the surface. All of these components will connect to the network’s buoys using acoustic signals underwater and an Iridium satellite link at the surface. “It will cover a really huge piece of the ocean,” says WHOI ocean ecologist Simon Thorrold, a Principal Investigator for the network. “Now, we’ll be able to get continuous measurements from a large chunk of the ocean twilight zone over significant periods of time. We play a leading role in ocean observation, and operate the most extensive suite of data-gathering platforms in the world.
Posted in Incredible
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New study takes comprehensive look at marine pollution

That’s the conclusion of a new study by an international coalition of scientists taking a hard look at the sources, spread, and impacts of ocean pollution worldwide. The study is the first comprehensive examination of the impacts of ocean pollution on human health. Waters most seriously impacted by ocean pollution include the Mediterranean Sea, the Baltic Sea, and Asian rivers. “The link between ocean pollution and human health has, for a long time, given rise to very few studies,” he says. It calls for robust monitoring of all forms of ocean pollution, including satellite monitoring and autonomous drones.
Posted in Eye Candy
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North Atlantic Ocean yields clues for better weather predictions

“Our knowledge of the interaction”—between the ocean and the atmosphere—“was mostly one way,” says Kwon, a senior scientist in WHOI’s Department of Physical Oceanography. A June paper that Kwon coauthored shows that “atmospheric blocking,” over the North Atlantic, a weather phenomenon that stalls the normal progression of weather, can be predicted due to its relationship to the ocean, and natural variability in the North Atlantic. This finding “will lead to more attention to how the ocean can be an important source of predictability in weather and climate,” says Kwon. The ability to forecast atmospheric blocking could have far-reaching implications for predicting its impact on elements of the Earth system such agriculture, sea ice, fisheries, and long-range weather. Atmospheric blocking above Greenland usually brings warmer temperatures that are favorable to Greenland ice melt.
Posted in Beauty
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NOAA Live! Saving Corals: A Day in the Life of a Coral Reef Scientist

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Beauty
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North Cascade NP, Washington, USA by Gary Blatter

Picture StorySnowshoed in the dark to an elevated position to capture sunrise and sunset light on two of the prominent mountains in the North Cascades National Park. After a four hour drive and a two hour hike in the light did not disappoint. If you are ever in Northwest Washington state do not miss a trip to this park. It is truly one of a kind location regardless of the season you can visit. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Best of
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Nuns Cross Farm, Dartmoor, Devon, England by Chris Marshall

Picture StorySnowfall in the Southwest of England is a rarity because the weather is generally very mild. My final plan was to photograph Nuns Cross Farm in the snow for the first time. It wasn’t long before the dense fog cleared revealing a band of ethereal mist above the old farm building about four hundred metres away. The layer of mist was moving quickly from left to right so I had to find an attractive composition swiftly. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
Posted in Best of
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Northern Lights Photography Workshop Feb 2021

However, we will also have the chance to capture the Northern Lights. Join us for a week-long workshop surrounded by great people, everlasting memories and photographing a unique place in Europe. • Tromso is the Aurora Capital of the world• Five nights enhances our chance to witness the Northern Lights• Tromso is the warmest place in the world to see the Northern LightsTromso consists of multiple islands connected by bridges which allow to change scenery easily. This Northern Lights Photography Workshop will cater for every photographer from beginners to experts. Therefore, each unique location will offer something to suit your photography capabilities.
Posted in Nature
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Ocean acidification causing coral ‘osteoporosis’ on iconic reefs

New research from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) reveals the distinct impact that ocean acidification is having on coral growth on some of the world’s iconic reefs. “This is the first unambiguous detection and attribution of ocean acidification’s impact on coral growth,” says lead author and WHOI scientist Weifu Guo. This phenomenon, known as ocean acidification, has led to a 20 percent decrease in the concentration of carbonate ions in seawater. Ocean acidification targets the density of the skeleton, silently whittling away at the coral’s strength, much like osteoporosis weakens bones in humans. The compounding effects of temperature, local stressors, and now ocean acidification will be devastating for many reefs.”
Posted in Beauty
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Observing Mooring Deployment at Pioneer Array

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. A pioneer in the development of deep-sea submersibles and remotely operated vehicle systems, he has taken part in more than 155 deep-sea expeditions. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Incredible
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Okavango and Linyanti Green Season Photo Tour Jan 2021

The Green Season is an underrated part of the year, when Botswana habitats burst in saturated colors of vegetation, when afternoon skies often greet travelers with storms and rainbows, and a number of visitors is at its lowest throughout the year. We will sample some of the best concessions in the Okavango Delta and Linyanti Waterfront on the border with Namibia. The green season sometimes offers amazing sightings of hundreds of elephants bathing in the Kwando River and its channels – and we hope to be next to them observing this ritual in a perfect harmony. You can find extensive information on the green season in Botswana in the blog section of our website, while more details of the safari are in the sidebar link. Allow us to show you African wildlife in unspoiled habitats, from a different angle to others!
Posted in Incredible
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Okavango Delta Photo Tour March 2022

Join us in 2022 in Botswana for a photographic safari adventure crafted to put you in a combination of exciting environments for outstanding photography. We will also take small planes deep into the Okavango Delta for a wealth of photographic experiences, again from boats. Then, another hop in a small plane and we are in the Moremi area of the Okavango with explorations by both boat and safari vehicle. A wide variety of birds nesting! Then, one more small plane ride back to Kasane and our transfer to Victoria Falls.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Oceans on Nautilus: Move Over, Mars: The Search for Life on Saturn’s Largest Moon

Move Over, Mars: The Search for Life on Saturn’s Largest Moon Alien microbes could be flourishing in the underground seas of Titan and the solar system’s other ocean worlds. But scientists believe this enigmatic world might harbor alien life. Larger than our moon and even Mercury, which is roughly two-fifths the size of Earth, Titan hosts plenty of intriguingly unique environments. But it is possible that on some of the ocean worlds, alien microbes could instead glean energy from hydrothermal—hot water—vents found near volcanoes rising from the bottom of these vast oceans. On the ocean worlds, the necessary force is provided by the constant gravitational pull of close orbits around the colossi of Saturn and Jupiter.
Posted in Beauty
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On the high seas

There is a big difference between living on the coast and actually going out to sea, says WHOI Trustee Sam Coleman. Being at sea was a world away from talking about ocean science at meetings, according to WHOI corporation member Eric Anderson. “I came away with a visceral appreciation for the WHOI mission and so incredibly impressed by the Armstrong team,” he says. “You’re on a ship that is pitching in 12-foot seas and you have this couple-thousand-pound vehicle you’re trying to get into the water and back out again. “All of us observing were caught up in the drama because there was no guaranteed happy ending,” he says.
Posted in Incredible
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Oceans on Nautilus: The Earth-Shaping Animal Migration No One Ever Sees

The Earth-Shaping Animal Migration No One Ever Sees A closer look at one of nature’s hidden wonders. This dance between light and dark, warm and cold, and predator and prey is called diel vertical migration (pronounced dial). “If you can think of an open ocean animal, there’s a pretty good chance that it goes through some form of vertical migration,” says Rebecca Helm, a marine biologist at the University of North Carolina Asheville. All day long, the sun’s rays charge up teeny, tiny algae called phytoplankton in the ocean’s uppermost layer. When all those tiny phytoplankton undergo photosynthesis at the surface, they consume carbon dioxide, says Helm.
Posted in Best of
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Orpheus explores the ocean’s greatest depths

Orpheus explores the ocean’s greatest depthsOrpheus, an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by WHOI, begins its descent into Veatch Canyon on the continental shelf off of the U.S. Northeast during one of several dives from the R/V Neil Armstrong in September 2019. The small, lightweight vehicle is the first in a new class of AUVs designed to withstand the pressure of the ocean’s greatest depths, while working independently or as a networked “fleet” to explore and conduct research in the deepest parts of our planet. Data collected with Orpheus will enable greater understanding of the ocean’s hadal zone (20,000 to 36,000 feet deep) and usher in a new era of hadal research. This includes investigations into trench ecosystems, and novel adaptations that have evolved to sustain life under extreme pressures in the deepest regions of our ocean. Photo by Evan Kovacs, Marine Imaging Technologies, LLC / Courtesy of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Posted in Incredible
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OSU Assumes Cyberinfrastructure Responsibility for OOI

A team at Oregon State University is assuming responsibility for the cyberinfrastructure that collects and serves data from five instrumented observatories operated by the Ocean Observatories Initiative. Photo by ©Ocean Observatories Initiative, 2020. “The OOI has become a dependable source of real-time ocean data, helping scientists answer pressing questions about the changing ocean. The team at OSU will help advance this work and ensure that OOI data are served reliably to an ever-growing audience. “We are also extremely grateful to the Rutgers team for the excellent foundation they established over the past six years that will allow a seamless transition to the OSU cyberinfrastructure team.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Penguins Are Nature’s Best Snugglers

Read: Penguins were a lonely explorer’s best friendsThough dominant winds can appear to push a huddle of penguins along the ice, the truth is more nuanced. Penguins in the huddle’s center, where temperatures can reach a sweltering 100 degrees Fahrenheit, mostly stand still. A bird who finds himself on the huddle’s windward side is soon driven to relocate to its warmer leeward side. As more birds leave the windward side, penguins in the center soon find themselves exposed. Work from this observatory supplements observations by onsite researchers and has allowed Zitterbart’s team to develop mathematical models that accurately forecast penguin huddles.
Posted in Nature
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Our Ocean. Our Planet. Our Future.

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Beauty
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Pantanal Wild Photography Adventure Oct 2021

The Pantanal in Brazil is the only place in the world where jaguars, habituated to photographers in boats, hunt during daylight hours. Hence it is the most predictable location on the planet to photograph jaguars. We have an outstanding 'jaguar camp' on a floating hotel right in the midst of prime jaguar habitat. We have also arranged Pantanal ground lodges before and after our 'time on the rivers' to enable other great Pantanal wildlife and scenery photography. Price$7700 Double Occupancy, $8990 Single OccupancyPlease see our COVID-19 Response and Offer on the Directory Company Page for Nature Photography Adventures
Posted in Nature
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Pandemic Quiet Is Helping Humans Eavesdrop on Rare Dolphins

A Burrunan dolphin has breached the surface before diving down and emitting the sound, which, ordinarily, would be received only by other aquatic animals. This time, however, the dolphin’s signal is picked up by a team of scientists, for whom the coronavirus pandemic has had a silver-dorsal lining. The reduction in noise has gifted Marine Mammal Foundation (MMF) scientists rare underwater quiet, and an unusual opportunity to effectively record and interpret the language of endangered Burrunan dolphins for the first time. Before then, there were only two known species of bottlenose in the world—the common bottlenose and the smaller, lighter-colored Indo-Pacific bottlenose. We know a lot about individually specific signature whistles of dolphins, thanks to a long-term research program in Sarasota, Florida.
Posted in Beauty
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Photo District News (PDN) to Be Retired, Rangefinder Shifts to All-Digital Format

NEW YORK — Emerald Expositions announced that as of today, Photo District News (PDN) will no longer publish content. Rangefinder will shift to an all-digital content hub with the WPPI exclusive edition distributed at the show this February 23-27 in Las Vegas. There will be greater integration between Rangefinder and WPPI. AboutRangefinder, WPPI, and PHOTOPLUS are owned by Emerald Expositions, a leading operator of business-to-business trade shows in the United States. The company currently operates more than 55 trade shows, as well as numerous other face-to-face events.
Posted in Beauty
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Phyatunturi, Luosto, Finland by Isabel Nolasco

I was chasing the northern lights, so I brought all my gear and expectations! Unfortunately, no forecasts could indicate any movements in that sense, so long northern lights. Anyway, I had a lot of fun capturing the magic of the snow and the perfect white landscapes. No regrets at all, on the contrary, I spent 12 awesome days of pure relaxation! Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Nature
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Pontal do Parana, Brazil by Luc Stadnik

Picture StoryIn 2019 we had two main astronomical events in Southern Brazil. In the first one it was absolutely impossible to shoot, even driving as far as 300km from home, once it was completely overcast. In the second, on the other hand, the forecast was great and my plane was to shoot the eclipsed full moon rising over the Atlantic Ocean. At the location I've found the right place and waited until the right time. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
Posted in Nature
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Prior Lake, Minnesota, USA by Laura Schoenbauer

Picture StoryWhenever I drive from my home to my parent's farm, I drive by this farm. This bright red barn stands out any time of year, but especially during the winter. A couple years ago, when we got a beautiful layer of snow overnight, I knew where I wanted to go. I had to try to pull over along the side of a snow covered road that has no shoulder. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Incredible
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Peru Photo Tour June 2021

Day 2 | Lima to Arequipa | (B, L, D)After enjoying breakfast together at the hotel, we will travel to the airport to take a flight to Arequipa. Day 8 | Cusco to Sacred Valley | (B, L, D)Day eight of this Photo Tour to Peru will take us to explore the incredible "Sacred Valley of the Incas." Day 10 | Sacred Valley | (B, L, D)Two of the highlights of the tour are in the schedule for this day. After lunch in town, we'll begin our journey to what will be the highlight of this Peru photo tour, Machu Picchu. Day 12 | Machu Picchu | (B, L, D)Today is a very special day!
Posted in Incredible
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Potent Atmospheric Rivers Douse the Pacific Northwest

The culprit was a phenomenon known as an atmospheric river. Atmospheric rivers are long, narrow bands of moisture that move like a river in the sky, carrying water vapor from the equator toward the poles. The animation above shows the signature of atmospheric rivers, including a particularly potent event that doused parts of Washington, Oregon, and Northern California. By the end of the animation (January 18), an atmospheric river system appeared to connect British Columbia and southeastern Alaska to Hawaii. Research has shown that more than 80 percent of western U.S. flood damage over a 40-year period was due to atmospheric rivers.
Posted in Incredible
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Putting the ‘nuclear coffin’ in perspective

There has been a flurry of headlines this summer about a "nuclear coffin" leaking radioactive waste into the Pacific Ocean. It’s arguably the region’s most visible scar from a series of U.S. nuclear weapons tests that took place off Bikini and Enewetak Atolls between 1946 and 1958. The concerns aren’t unfounded—the area has been a hotspot for lingering radioactivity for more than half a century. But according to Ken Buesseler, a world-renowned expert in marine radioactivity at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), the concerns are nothing new. A more recent study from Columbia suggests that radiation levels vary significantly between islands, and higher levels have been measured on nearby Bikini and Rongelap atolls.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Reine, Lofoten Islands, Norway by Janet Burdon

Picture StoryThe light of a winter dawn illuminates Mount Olstind on the Lofoten Isles with the pretty village of Reine in the foreground. We had arrived in Reine the previous evening after a long and arduous journey. Three flights with three different airlines, and then a long drive over snow covered roads to our accommodation. A short walk along the road took us to a viewpoint where we set up for this shot. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Incredible
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Puffin study encourages us to be mindful of our “sound footprint”

ARAN: They’re not just influenced by loud sounds, like a jet going overhead; But they’re also influenced by relatively quiet sounds. ARAN: We often think of the really loud sounds like underwater explosions or drilling for oil or maybe sonar. But small increases in the background noise, at least small disturbances can really influence the animals. So, after years of studying sound in animals, Mooney says it’s clear that our impact on noise may have the furtherest reaching consequences across the animal kingdom. ARAN: Even just in the areas we’ve been studying puffins we’ve worked in somewhat secret habitats, meaning there aren’t a lot of tourists visiting these areas.
Posted in Incredible
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Rainbow Park, Shirebrook, Derbyshire, England by Robert Palmer

When I saw the weather conditions on this particular day, I knew I wanted to go to a local park to take some photos. Having become familiar with the park, I had a good idea of the viewpoints I could use. Having taken several shots around the park, I then had to process them to achieve the result I wanted. This gave me the overall “feel” that I wanted, the mood emanating from the conditions, the fog softening the shapes, the foreground tree being prominent. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Rising Tides: preparing for the future

What are the key challenges facing leaders at the federal, state, regional, and local level and how can resources best be put to use to address the multi-faceted challenges associated with climate change on Cape Cod? Hear from representatives at each level and their vision for leadership on this important issue. KeynoteCongressman Bill Keating, Massachusetts 9th Congressional districtPanel DiscussionModerator: Emiley Lockhart, WHOIPanelistsMegan English Braga, Chair, Falmouth Select BoardSenator Susan Moran, Massachusetts State SenateDr. Hear how WHOI, MBL, NEFSC, and local businesses are preparing for a future of climate change impacts. The climate resiliency study and symposium were funded by the Massachusetts Seaport Economic Council.
Posted in Incredible
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Sandakphu, West Bengal, India by Debarshi Das

Picture StoryKangchenjunga, also spelled Kanchenjunga, is the third highest mountain in the world. It lies between Nepal and Sikkim, India, with three of the five peaks (Main, Central, and South) directly on the border, and the remaining two (West and Kangbachen) in Nepal's Taplejung District. Allowing for further verification of all calculations, it was officially announced in 1856 that Kangchenjunga is the third highest mountain in the world. This is the last light of the sun touching the grand view of Kachnejunga from the highest point of West Bengal state of India. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Saint-Irenee, Quebec, Canada by Jacques Geoffroy

Picture StoryIn February 2020, I was walking on the train tracks following the gorgeous St-Lawrence River near Saint-Irénée, Quebec, Canada. The river has tides that can reach seven meters, so it sculpts fabulous ice blocks. I approached my model and composed the image including other less seductive ice blocks in the frame. When the sun rose, I was blown away by the shape, texture and transparency of my model. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Incredible
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Sarek NP, Swedish Lapland, Sweden by Marta Breto

Picture StoryIt was my second attempt to cross Sarek National Park, also known as Europe’s last wilderness. I enjoyed my last incursion so much that I repeated the same autumn dates in order to photograph the reddish and yellow tones on the plants. We walked over the taiga and tundra, made some harsh river crossings, ate some blueberries and photographed reindeer herds and nice landscape views. Everything was so nice until suddenly my partner and I found ourselves trapped in the middle of a windstorm. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
Posted in Best of
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Sands and Mats at Padre Island

An astronaut on the International Space Station (ISS) shot this photograph of a portion of Padre Island, a long barrier island along the southern Texas coast. For this reason, the beach appears wider and extends farther seaward on South Padre Island. Stretching north from the channel, Padre Island National Seashore protects nearly 80 miles (130 kilometers) of beaches for nature and recreation. North and South Padre Islands are well known for attracting tourists and beachgoers, but they have also intrigued scientists. Extensive microbial mats—multi-layered sheets of microorganisms such as bacteria—take advantage of this natural protection and thrive in the protected tidal flats along the backshore of Padre Island.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Sentry dives to a biological oasis

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Incredible
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Science is the way forward

AdvertisementThe story of ozone and public health casts scientists as vigilant and courageous heroes on a quest for understanding in the service of the public good. Society must again turn to scientists for solutions if we are to restore reason and calm to the crises facing humanity — from COVID-19 to climate change. As with ozone, the scientific understanding is definitive and has been for years: Carbon dioxide emissions cause climate change. Scientists have been deciphering the ocean’s role in global climate, finding new tools to forecast hurricanes and droughts, and documenting the impact of climate change on fisheries, agriculture, and wildlife. By definition, science seeks to avoid bias, remain independent, refute falsehoods, and seek answers based on evidence, reason, and consensus.
Posted in Nature
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'SharkCam' films basking sharks off Scotland

'SharkCam' films basking sharks off Scotland Published duration 28 Augustimage copyright WHOI image caption The sharks were observed swimming just above the seabedA robot camera has been used in UK seas for the first time to monitor the behaviour of basking sharks. SharkCam was deployed off the west coast of Scotland where the sharks gather to breed after migrating from waters off west Africa. Basking sharks, an endangered species, are the world's second largest fish after whale sharks, sometimes growing to more than 10m (33ft) long. But studying the footage gathered last summer by SharkCam, scientists noted the sharks spent long periods just above the seabed and were not feeding. image copyright WHOI image caption A basking shark close to the surface with its mouth open in feeding behaviourNatureScot, formerly Scottish Natural Heritage, worked on the project with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, WWF/Sky Ocean Rescue and the University of Exeter.
Posted in Incredible
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Smart cameras keep lookout for endangered whales

With numbers hovering around 360 individuals, the North Atlantic right whale is critically endangered. Authorities in the U.S. and Canada use spotter planes to search for North Atlantic right whales so they can issue warnings to nearby ships. But planes can’t be used at night or in bad weather, nor can observers detect whales swimming in deep water. The cameras are linked to artificial intelligence that Zitterbart's team has trained on examples of waves, birds, vessels and whales. Unlike human observation from planes and boats, these cameras don’t require ambient light, so they can spot whales around the clock.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Sokolik, Rudawy Janowickie, Poland by Andrzej Muzaj

When the air is clear, it offers a great view of the sunrise all year long. It took me another half an hour to hike up to the peak, through the empty and snowy forest, bathed in the moonlight. It was still at least an hour before sunrise, but the top platform is very small and holds up only ten people. Still, I've managed to capture this peaceful scene: villages below, slowly waking up for the next day, covered with snow. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Best of
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Snowy and Icy Peaks with Very Different Origins

Like their earthly cousins, some of those peaks are covered in blankets of white. But the origins of these ice-like deposits are very different. And unlike the way winds tend to ride up over mountains on Earth, the winds on Pluto mostly travel downslope. That gas can saturate, condense, and then freeze directly on mountain peaks without any clouds forming. At lower altitudes on Pluto, there is no methane frost because there is too little methane for condensation to occur.
Posted in Best of
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South Rim, Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA by J Fritz Rumpf

Picture StoryIt had been an unusually strong snow storm. Many parts of the Grand Canyon park were closed to traffic. I almost did not get out of the car, since the temperature was below the freezing point, and the wind quite strong. Hard to believe that not too far from this spot, the Arizona desert stretches to the horizon. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
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Sparta, WI, USA by Jackie Hubbard

The woods creaked and swayed in the somberness of dying daylight, and I stood there beneath this tree. The branches were eerily twisting in all directions trying to reach to the top of the overcast sky. It stood there dormant and dark, seeming at first eerie with it’s bent branches and coarse, brown bark. With one click I had encapsulated this tree in that simple, sullen, solitary moment for the rest of time. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
Posted in Eye Candy
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St Charles, Idaho, USA by Juan Pablo Spicer-Escalante

I quickly pulled over and grabbed my gear. As soon as I finished taking a series of images, a light snowfall began once again, ending the brief photo session...Hey VisitorDid you know that now we offer a VIP membership? Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers. Benefits of VIP membership:• Your own portfolio page – click here to see sample• We promote your portfolio monthly to over 700,000 followers• Download 12 new issues of the magazine every year• Download ALL back issues• Download 2 premium eBooks worth £19.45. • Upload and share up to 48 images per year via our monthly assignments• Upload and share up to 24 images per year via our picture submission form• Fast Support – we aim to reply within 24 hours• Submission Priority – your submission goes to the front of the queueDimitri Vasileiou • EditorSubscribe to VIP now
Posted in Beauty
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St-Donat-de-Montcalm, Quebec, Canada by Jacques Geoffroy

Picture StoryIn mid December on a snowshoe trek at St-Donat-de-Montcalm, Quebec, Canada, I was hoping to find a panoramic view of the surrounding area from the top of the mountain. I was entranced by the snow covering the trees in the foreground and the mountains in the background. Hey VisitorDid you know that now we offer a VIP membership? Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers. Benefits of VIP membership:• Your personal portfolio page – click here to see sample• We promote your portfolio monthly to over 400,000 followers• Download 12 new issues of the magazine every year• Download ALL back issues• Download 2 premium eBooks worth £19.45.
Posted in Nature
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Specialized Camera System Gives Novel View of Ocean Life

These mostly microscopic organisms—plant-like phytoplankton and tiny animals known as zooplankton—form the base of most ocean food webs. In spite of their importance, plankton communities in the ocean are poorly understood—in part because the ocean is vast, and plankton communities vary widely by location and over time. Such a vast area would be impossible to sample comprehensively with conventional net tows, so Sosik is using a specialized underwater camera system to image plankton in situ, under the water. The findings are certain to revolutionize our understanding of plankton community dynamics, with implications for ocean food webs, fisheries, and global climate. About the Simons FoundationThe Simons Foundation’s mission is to advance the frontiers of research in mathematics and the basic sciences.
Posted in Best of
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Stony Plain, Alberta, Canada by Larry Day

Picture StoryAs I sit in -40 degrees Celsius weather, I often wonder why we venture out. This picture was taken just before a polar vortex hit and the snow and cold hit all at once. I view small snippets of a larger picture to be just as valid as the sweeping grandeur of mountains. Hey VisitorDid you know that now we offer a VIP membership? Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Best of
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Studies investigate marine heatwaves, shifting ocean currents

In the ocean, extreme warming conditions are also becoming more frequent and intense. Two new studies from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) investigate marine heatwaves and currents at the edge of the continental shelf, which impact regional ocean circulation and marine life. During El Niño periods, the temperature and salinity anomalies associated with marine heatwaves are limited to the ocean surface, showing that complex ocean processes play an important role in the depth-extent of extreme events. Ryan and her colleagues are using a similar modeling approach to study marine heatwaves in the Northwest Atlantic. “The challenge, wherever you go, is that marine heatwaves have so many drivers,” Ryan said.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Study reconstructs ancient storms to help predict changes in world’s tropical cyclone hotspot

“Atmospheric circulation changes due to modern, human-induced climate warming are opposite of the circulation changes due to the Little Ice Age,” notes Bramante. “So we can expect to see the opposite effect in the deep tropics—a decrease in tropical cyclones close to the equator. He plans to expand the Marshall Islands study westward to the Philippines to study where tropical cyclones have historically formed and how climate conditions influence a storm’s track and intensity. Better understanding of how storms behaved under previous conditions will help scientists understand what causes changes in tropical cyclone activity and aid people living in coastal communities prepare for extreme weather in the future, he said. We play a leading role in ocean observation, and operate the most extensive suite of data-gathering platforms in the world.
Posted in Beauty
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Study Sheds Light on Critically Endangered Beluga Whale Population

A team of scientists from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and NOAA Fisheries are collaborating to help stem the decline of a critically endangered population of beluga whales in the Cook Inlet, Alaska. A study recently published in Animal Microbiome outlines important first steps in understanding epidermal microbial communities in beluga whales, as well as their role in beluga health. Beluga whales in Cook Inlet, Alaska are critically endangered. Despite protections that have been in place 2006, beluga whales living in the Cook Inlet region of Alaska are still declining, currently numbering approximately 300 members. Many other populations of beluga whales remain healthy, including the neighboring population in Bristol Bay, Alaska.
Posted in Nature
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Study reconstructs ancient storms to predict changes in world’s cyclone hotspot

“Atmospheric circulation changes due to modern, human-induced climate warming are opposite of the circulation changes due to the Little Ice Age,” notes Bramante. “So we can expect to see the opposite effect in the deep tropics—a decrease in tropical cyclones close to the equator. It could be good news for the southern Marshall Islands, but other areas would be threatened as the average location of cyclone generation shifts north,” he adds. He plans to expand the Marshall Islands study westward to the Philippines to study where tropical cyclones have historically formed and how climate conditions influence a storm’s track and intensity. We play a leading role in ocean observation, and operate the most extensive suite of data-gathering platforms in the world.
Posted in Nature
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Taking a Measure of Sea Level Rise: Ice Height

Editor’s Note—This article is one in a series about how NASA and other science institutions measure and monitor sea level rise. While melting ice is not the only contributor to sea level rise, satellite records since the 1990s show that it has been the largest contributor. That is one third of the total amount of sea level rise observed over that period. Find more stories about our changing oceans and coasts in Earth Observatory’s sea level rise collection. The Sea Level Change Data Pathfinder on NASA’s Earthdata site highlights tools used by researchers to study ice sheet altimetry, including ICESat Global Antarctic and Greenland Ice Sheet Altimetry Data, ICESat-2 Land Ice Height, GRACE and GRACE-FO Greenland Ice Mass Anomalies, and Antarctic Ice Mass Anomalies.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Taking a Measure of Sea Level Rise: Land Motion

Editor’s Note—This article is one in a series about how NASA and other science institutions measure and monitor sea level rise. Find more stories about our changing oceans and coasts in Earth Observatory’s sea level rise collection. Explore other stories of sea level by our NASA colleagues in Rising Waters. Looking for data related to land motion and sea level rise? The Sea Level Change Data Pathfinder on NASA’s Earthdata site highlights data used by researchers to study Glacial Isostatic Adjustment.
Posted in Best of
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Taking a Measure of Sea Level Rise: Ocean Altimetry

Editor’s Note—This article is one in a series about how NASA and other science institutions measure and monitor sea level rise. They estimate that over the past 140 years, global mean sea level has risen 21 to 24 centimeters (8 to 9 inches). Find more stories about our changing oceans and coasts in Earth Observatory’s sea level rise collection. Looking for data related to sea level rise? The Sea Level Change Data Pathfinder on NASA’s Earthdata site highlights tools used by researchers to study ocean altimetry, including the Integrated Multi-Mission Ocean Altimeter Data for Climate Research.
Posted in Nature
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The Bounty of the Ocean

Scott Lindell, a research specialist at WHOI, says marine aquaculture—particularly farmed shellfish and seaweeds—provide essential micronutrients and bioactive compounds for human health. Seaweed, a generic name for the countless species of marine plants and algae, also offer a crucial ecosystem service. By removing carbon from the water, these plants reduce regional water acidification while promoting biodiversity in the ecosystem. Some communities are even using shellfish aquaculture as an alternative to sewering. Going deep for new treatmentsMost people view the ocean as a source of food, a site for recreation, and a mode of transport, but scientists believe the ocean holds potential treatments for many chronic diseases, as well as a source for new antibiotics.
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The Dolomites Photography Workshop Oct 2020

Exploring the Dolomites’ iconic landscapes truly feels like embarking on an amazing photographic journey to the top of Europe. You will discover the Dolomites’ less explored and less photographed spots that make these UNESCO World Heritage landscapes a truly unique destination for landscape photography! During our Dolomites Photography Workshop we will photograph every day, including the first and last day of the trip. During our Dolomites Photography Workshop we will do daily image review sessions, allowing me to help you create a strong, consistent Portfolio as well as to give you my technical and artistic tips for our next sessions in the field. My Dolomites Photography Workshop is open to everyone, from beginners to professionals.
Posted in Beauty
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The New Zealand Photographer Everyone Should Know

“Urban Drift,” an exhibition featuring Westra’s photographs, is on view at Anastasia Photo in New York through February 22. After moving to New Zealand from The Netherlands in 1957, Westra embarked on a career as a full-time freelance documentary photographer. Primarily working for the Department of Education and Te Ao Hou, a Māori magazine, Westra traveled extensively throughout New Zealand and the South Pacific. A pioneer of the New Zealand documentary photography genre, Westra developed a humanist style known for its realism and spontaneity. “Urban Drift”By Ans WestraAnastasia PhotoThrough February 22, 2020Related ArticlesLessons in Wild SummersGoing Inside the Infamous Mongrel MobsNew Zealand Glaciers
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The Hasselblad XCD 4/45P Lens Expands the X System to 10 Lenses

At a size of 1.85 inches in depth and weight of only 0.71 pounds, the new $1,099 Hasselblad XCD 4/45P lens enters their XCD lens family of medium-format lenses as the lightest, most compact model available. The XCD 4/45P is roughly the same width as the X1D II 50C camera. The X1D II 50C with new XCD 4/45P lens at roughly 36mm in 35mm equivalence. Keep your eyes to the February issue of PDN for our full review of the Hasselblad X System X1D II 50C camera. The Hasselblad XCD 4/45P lens will ship by the end of this month.
Posted in Eye Candy
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The Metrics You Need to Measure Marketing Automation Effectiveness

Monitor Behavioral TriggersSupporter behavior is a crucial metric to track as it’s what drives your email marketing automation campaign. The Response MetricsOkay, your activity metrics point to the practical use of marketing automation. These metrics will show you whether your nonprofit email marketing efforts are resonating with the audience and answer the question of audience engagement levels. But… email marketing automation often tends to deliver more messages. This is also your best metric for proving the ROI on your email marketing automation.
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The $500 billion question: what’s the value of studying the ocean’s biological carbon pump?

The ocean plays an invaluable role in capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere, taking in somewhere between five to 12 gigatons (billion tons) annually. The biological carbon pump is fueled by tiny plant-like organisms floating on the ocean surface called phytoplankton, which consume carbon dioxide in the process of photosynthesis. A warmer, more acidic ocean could weaken the carbon pump, causing atmospheric temperatures to rise—or it could get stronger, with the opposite effect. “Not only do we not know how big this pump is, we don’t know whether it will remove more or less carbon dioxide in the future. Though the paper’s assessment doesn’t account for the cost of a global research program, Buesseler said that investment would be a small fraction of the $500 billion expected benefit.
Posted in Beauty
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The Ukrainian Soldiers Who Can’t Rest

Blatty knows about war. A combat veteran of Afghanistan and Iraq, in 2018 she embedded with volunteer soldiers of the war in eastern Ukraine. “Frontline / Peace Life: Ukraine’s Revolutionaries of the Forgotten War,” a new exhibition at the Ukrainian Institute of America, chronicles Blatty’s determination to document the Ukrainian soldiers’ fierce patriotism and the struggles they faced to return home after years on the frontline. When Blatty went to Ukraine, drawn by the community soldiers create, she intended to “document and preserve a form a patriotism” far from her own reality of fighting wars. But how was I a patriot for simply doing what Uncle Sam told me to do, under contracted obligation?” asks Blatty.
Posted in Best of
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The Oldest Crewed Deep Sea Submarine Just Got a Big Makeover

In early March, a gleaming white submarine called Alvin surfaced off the Atlantic coast of North Carolina after spending the afternoon thousands of feet below the surface. For Bruce Strickrott, Alvin’s chief pilot and the leader of the expedition, these sorts of missions to the bottom of the world are a regular part of life. By the time Alvin’s makeover is wrapped up in late 2021, the storied submarine will rank among the most capable human-rated deep sea submersibles in the world. Courtesy of Woods Hole Oceanographic InstitutionTo upgrade Alvin, engineers had to tear the sub down to its metal skeleton at the National Deep Submergence Facility, a federally funded research space hosted at Woods Hole. The vessel is made almost entirely from custom components designed to withstand the uniquely hostile environment in the deep ocean, and the regular teardowns ensure that everything is in good shape.
Posted in Incredible
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This Week in Photography & Filmmaking Gear

** News **The Canon EOS-1 DX Mark III Is Here – PDNAnd So Is the Nikon D780 – RangefinderNew Incredibly Tiny Light Kits for Filmmakers – Cinema 5DCanon Has a Lightroom Plugin for Image Culling – Digital TrendsLenovo Intros Smart Digital Frame – MashableInsta360’s New Modular Camera – NewsshooterSanDisk Rolls Out 8TB SSD Drive – EngadgetDell’s New Laptops Break the Rules – CNETWant a 55-inch Monitor? Acer’s Got One – VergeDell’s New Laptop Has a Jazzed Up Display – ARS TechnicaMacOS Messes with Canon-Lightroom Tethering – PetaPixelDEALS: Last Chance Rebates, Expiring Soon** Reviews **First Look at the Nikon D6 – DP Review5 Reasons Why Android Still Tops iOS in 2020 – Pro Video CoalitionInitial Review of the Canon EOS-1 DX Mark III – DP ReviewWhy I’m Sticking with Lightroom Classic, For Now – PetaPixelDEALS: Shop the Deal of the Day** Tips **Three Things Most Photogs Get Wrong About Flash – SLR LoungePhotoshop Sharpening for Beginners – Digital Photography SchoolOur Top Five Tips of 2019 – PDNHow to Photographic Atmospheric Glassware – WorkphloWhy High ISO Is Not Your Enemy – PhotoFocus** Buyers Guides**15 of the Best Photoshop Add-Ons – We and the ColorFour Powerful Laptops for Pros – Popular ScienceGreat Backdrops and Props for Portrait Photographers – Rangefinder
Posted in Incredible
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Three Bridges St Jacobs, Ontario, Canada by Tracey Saraceni

Picture StoryThe weather cleared after a massive snowstorm so I grabbed my hiking boots and camera gear and headed out to a favourite trail just outside of the city. I was surprised with the vibrant teal color of the almost frozen creek against the white and silver of the forest around it. The gurgling of the water and the occasional chirp of the resident birds were the only sounds. Hey VisitorDid you know that now we offer a VIP membership? Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Best of
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The value of green infrastructure for coastal communities

Global climate change is increasing the threats of storms and sea-level rise to coastal communities. As a result, coastal cities such as New York and Boston—as well as many smaller coastal communities—are considering investing in “green” infrastructure to enhance their resilience to coastal hazards. Green infrastructure creates or maintains a “living shoreline” that can include wetlands, oyster reefs, barrier islands, and ecologically enhanced bulkheads and revetments. If green infrastructure is well-integrated into a larger upland-to-wetland landscape, it can provide important habitat for plants and animals. By giving coastal managers a new tool to assess the economic value of the ecosystem services associated with living shorelines, this new methodology should facilitate the wider inclusion of green infrastructure in climate adaptation planning and coastal protection, to the benefit of coastal communities and the environment.
Posted in Nature
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Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada by Susan Dykstra

Picture StoryIn my home town of Thunder Bay we rarely get this beautiful hoarfrost in the valley. On this particular day it was amazing to see that it was so thick with frost and lasted most of the day. As I lie on my back in the snow I was looking for pleasing compositions of the white branches covered with frost against the blue of the sky. Hey VisitorDid you know that now we offer a VIP membership? Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
Posted in Best of
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Timberline Ski Area, Mount Hood, Oregon, USA by Lynn Hopwood

Picture StoryDecember 27, 2020 I left my home in Prosser, Washington at 4:00 am and drove through thick winter fog for approximately an hour before it cleared on my way to Timberline Ski area near Government Camp, Oregon. This famous ski location has a great view of Mount Hood and I wanted to be there before sunrise. Because it was a Sunday morning when I arrived at the Timberline Ski area near Government Camp, Oregon I encountered more car congestion than I had planned for, which slowed down my time considerably. I was stunned and amazed by the pink sky and lenticular cloud over the top of Mount Hood. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Beauty
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Transformative technology to revolutionize the way we listen to the deep ocean

Most of the ocean is visually inaccessible to humans. The ocean is also impenetrable to many communication and geolocation technologies, such as radio waves, GPS, and other forms of electromagnetic radiation. Sound travels effectively through seawater—a feature known to marine mammals, which have evolved to use sound to communicate, find food, and navigate underwater. Oceanographers have also taken advantage of sound’s ability to propagate through seawater, using underwater acoustic technologies to greatly advance our understanding of the ocean and marine ecosystems. But using sound to “see” into a noisy ocean has its challenges, and it can be difficult to distinguish individual acoustic signatures amidst the cacophony of the underwater soundscape.
Posted in Nature
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Tracing Changes in Ozone-Depleting Chemicals

For more than 30 years, nations have been working to protect Earth’s stratospheric ozone layer by banning the new production and trade of ozone-depleting substances. Part of that effort has included tracking the atmospheric concentration of such chemicals. In the 1970 and 80s, scientists discovered that chemicals widely used in refrigerants and insulating foams were rising into the stratosphere. Even after production ceased, scientists still expected chemicals like CFC-11 to continue leaking from existing products for years, but at a gradually declining rate. In 2018, NOAA first reported that atmospheric CFC-11 had declined less than expected, hinting that something had changed.
Posted in Nature
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Two great white sharks tagged off the coast of Mass., and you can track one of them on Twitter

“Just letting you all know that I’m off the coast of Nantucket a little south from where I was tagged,” Andromache tweeted on Tuesday. AdvertisementThe OCEARCH team tagged Andromache during a research trip called Expedition Massachusetts, which launched earlier this month. The second great white that OCEARCH tagged, dubbed Monomoy after the island he was spotted near, measured 6 feet, 7 inches long — smaller than most sharks that have been observed in the area. “At 6′ 7″ long, he’s the smallest shark we’ve tagged in this area,” OCEARCH tweeted. “It was a male white shark less than 7 feet long.
Posted in Best of
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Two New Studies Substantially Advance Understanding of Currents that Help Regulate Climate

This flow of deep water is formed as surface waters in the region cool, releasing heat to the atmosphere, becoming colder and denser. Scientists have long suspected that warming in in the Arctic and North Atlantic could disrupt the formation of this deep water formation, causing the AMOC to change or weaken and cause significant changes to regional and global climate patterns. “Where and how dense water is formed in the Nordic Seas is likely to change in a warming climate,” said Huang. Funding for these studies was provided by the US National Science Foundation under grants OCE-1558742, OCE-1259618, OCE-1558742, and OCE-1259618. We play a leading role in ocean observation, and operate the most extensive suite of data-gathering platforms in the world.
Posted in Nature
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Uffington Castle, Oxfordshire, England by David Hawkes

Wonderful, a great exhibition and a fascinating and beautiful house; almost a pilgrimage to anyone in love with photography. Also known for one of the famous white horse chalk carvings laid near to the top of the site. As the highest point in Oxfordshire it offers views for miles around - over six counties. It was the first time I had ever used a high resolution digital camera and the detail when printed astonished me. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
Posted in Nature
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Uganda Gorilla and Chimp Photo Safari October 2021

This workshop / safari run by Untamed Photography’s award-winning wildlife photographers will take you on an inspirational and once in a lifetime 10 day photographic journey through the heart of Uganda. Uganda in Focus is located in the vast forests of Kibale, Bwindi and Queen Elizabeth National Park. We will take an adventurous trek down the rainforest spotting many species of wildlife on the way. With our local and more than friendly Ugandan staff we will ensure your stay with us to be unique and fulfilling. Untamed Photography provides English speaking wildlife photographers and local staff at all accommodation during our unique photographic safaris.
Posted in Beauty
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Two Studies Advance Understanding of Critical Ocean Currents

This flow of deep water is formed as surface waters in the region cool, releasing heat to the atmosphere, becoming colder and denser. “Where and how dense water is formed in the Nordic Seas is likely to change in a warming climate,” said Huang. “These two studies fundamentally advance our understanding of the origin and pathways of the densest overflow water supplying the deep limb of the AMOC,” said WHOI physical oceanographer Robert Pickart, who is second author on both papers. Funding for these studies was provided by the US National Science Foundation under grants OCE-1558742, OCE-1259618, OCE-1558742, and OCE-1259618. We play a leading role in ocean observation, and operate the most extensive suite of data-gathering platforms in the world.
Posted in Nature
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Ultimate New Zealand Photography Tour April 2021

Join Richard Young, Ken Wright and Shaun Barnett, on an 18-day photography tour showcasing some of New Zealand's most iconic landscape including Milford Sound and the Moeraki Boulders along with some of the country's exceptional coastal wildlife. For the first four days of our tour we will be based in Wanaka and take in our Autumn Masterclass Workshop, designed to perfect your techniques of shooting autumn landscapes, autumn abstracts and panoramic landscape photography. It will leave you with refined skills to help create stunning photographs for the rest of the tour. North of the Catlins we will explore the Otago Peninsula known as New Zealand’s wildlife capital. Doubtful Sound is far more remote and scenic than the well-known Milford Sound, offering a true wilderness experience.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Unboxing Tamron’s SP 35mm f/1.4 Di USD

This year marks the 40th anniversary of Tamron’s SP lens line. To celebrate, they’ve introduced a prime lens that represents the culmination of the design and technology skills they’ve amassed in over four decades of lens making. That lens is the SP 35mm f/1.4 Di USD for Canon and Nikon full-frame DSLRs. It’s a stacked lens, with the second generation of Tamron’s Broad-Band Anti-Reflection coating (BBAR-G2) to minimize flare and ghosting. Autofocusing is driven by Tamron’s Ultrasonic Silent Drive with a newly-developed Dynamic Rolling-cam mechanism which improves performance and reliability when working in extreme temperatures.
Posted in Incredible
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Unicorns of the Arctic face a new potential threat

Narwhals may be known as the unicorns of the Artic, but unlike their mythical counterparts, they’re not immortal. Now these unusual creatures may be facing a threat we’ve become all too familiar with: COVID-19. But Neel Aluru, a marine biologist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), says that’s not necessarily the case. Narwhals have nearly the same “binding sites” as humans, which potentially puts them in a high-risk category. “The binding sites work like a lock-and-key mechanism,” Aluru says.
Posted in Incredible
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Vol. 39, No. 2, November 1996

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of
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Vol. 40, No. 1, April 1997

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Nature
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Vol. 40, No. 2, November 1997

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Incredible
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Vol. 41, No. 1, April 1998

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Nature
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Visual Stories to Fight the Stigma of HIV

Through Positive Eyes is a photography and storytelling project created in collaboration with 130 “artivists” living with HIV/AIDS. The project serves “as a call to action to bring an end to the stigma of HIV,” writes Aperture in the press release. “Stigma grows out of fear, which prevents people from getting themselves tested and treated,” writes Gere. In the exhibition, a multitude of voices coalesce around the core belief that challenging stigma is the most effective way to combat the epidemic. That’s what Through Positive Eyes is all about,” writes Gere.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Vol. 41, No. 2, December 1998

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of
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Vol. 42, No. 1, April 2000

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Nature
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Vol. 43, No. 1, November 2004

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Beauty
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Vol. 44, No. 2, September 2005

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Vol. 43, No. 2, December 2004

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Incredible
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Vol. 42, No. 2, April 2004

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Incredible
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Vol. 44, No. 3, December 2005

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Incredible
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Vol. 44, No. 1, June 2005

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Beauty
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Vol. 45, No. 1, April 2006

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of
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Vol. 45, No. 3, July 2007

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Nature
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Vol. 45, No. 2, August 2006

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Beauty
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Vol. 46, No. 1, January 2008

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of
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Vol. 46, No. 3, September 2008

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Nature
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Vol. 46, No. 2, April 2008

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Incredible
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Vol. 47, No. 2, September 2009

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Vol. 47, No. 3, December 2009

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Vol. 47, No. 1, December 2008

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Vol. 48, No. 2, December 2010

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Incredible
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Vol. 48, No. 3, October 2011

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Beauty
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Vol. 48, No. 1, June 2010

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Nature
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Vol. 49, No. 1, December 2011

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of
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Vol. 49, No. 2, May 2012

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of
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Vol. 49, No. 3, December 2012

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of
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Vol. 51, No. 2, Winter 2016

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Beauty
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Vol. 50, No. 2, Fall 2013

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of
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Vol. 50, No. 1, Spring 2013

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Nature
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Vol. 52, No. 1, Summer 2016

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Nature
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Vol. 52, No. 2, Spring 2017

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Beauty
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Vol. 53, No. 1, Winter 2017

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Vol. 53, No. 2, Fall 2018

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of
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Vol. 54, No. 1, Spring 2019

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Vol. 54, No. 2, Fall 2019

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Nature
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Vol. 55, No. 1, Spring 2020

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of
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Volcanoes Of Kamchatka Photo Tour July 2021

This tour is for people who are in love with life, new emotions and new discoveries. It is for those who would like to see the beauty of our big world with one's own eyes. And, of course, if you like holding a camera in your hands, you will have many reasons to do so during our programme. Our guide will take pleasure in showing you how to take pictures which make your friends and colleagues really jealous. We will visit the foot of Tolbachik and climb up to the top of active volcanic cones.
Posted in Beauty
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Vol. 55, No. 2, Fall 2020

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Nature
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Wave Glider provides gateway to remote exploration

While WHOI’s more familiar autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) Sentry is exploring the seafloor for hydrothermal vents at depth, it will relay data back acoustically via the Wave Glider. Why does the Wave Glider interest you? The Wave Glider is critical to that as a gateway. How does the Wave Glider work with existing underwater vehicles and what problems does it help solve? If Sentry finds anything interesting in its sensor data—if it “sniffs” a new vent—it will be able to alert me via the Wave Glider immediately.
Posted in Nature
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Weser, Weyhe, Germany by Vivien Renziehausen

Picture StoryThe coldest day since about 4 years! This morning we had -17°C and my fingers froze within seconds when I took my gloves off to change the lens. Hey VisitorDid you know that now we offer a VIP membership? Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers. Benefits of VIP membership:• Your personal portfolio page – click here to see sample• We promote your portfolio monthly to over 400,000 followers• Download 12 new issues of the magazine every year• Download ALL back issues• Download 2 premium eBooks worth £19.45.
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West Montrose, Ontario, Canada by Tracey Saraceni

Follow us Follow usPicture StoryWest Montrose is a small village in Southwest Ontario that is home to the famous Kissing Bridge, the only remaining covered bridge in Ontario. Built in 1881, it spans the Grand River at an impressive 200ft. The bright red paint is a stark contrast to the white snow coating the fields and trees which surround it. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers. Benefits of VIP membership:• Your own portfolio page – click here to see sample• We promote your portfolio monthly to over 700,000 followers• Download 12 new issues of the magazine every year• Download ALL back issues• Download 2 premium eBooks worth £19.45.
Posted in Beauty
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What's In That Water? 'Geochemical Santa Claus' Offers New Data To Climate Modelers

That new data should help researchers make better models of Earth’s past and future climate. This is a number that so many modelers have wanted,” says lead study author Kimberley Mayfield, with a laugh. The additional data should lead to better models of Earth’s past climate, says Matthew Charette, a senior scientist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and co-author on the paper. He says improving models of the past should help us better understand the current changes in Earth’s climate. “We want to improve climate models for reasons that I believe are obvious at this point,” says Mayfield.
Posted in Best of
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Who is Peter de Menocal? A Conversation with WHOI’s new President & Director

I entered as a graduate student in 1987, studying marine geology and paleoceanography at the Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, one of best Earth science research labs. These were heady, exciting times at Columbia, as climate science was really taking off. Since 1968, WHOI has partnered with MIT to form one of the premier marine science and engineering graduate programs in the world—the MIT-WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography, Applied Science & Engineering. And it increases diversity in the sciences by inspiring bright young minds from underrepresented groups to pursue ocean science careers. Winning hearts and minds to protect the oceans—so they will continue to protect us—requires more than just our amazing science, engineering, and discovery.
Posted in Beauty
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WHOI establishes new fund to accelerate microplastics innovation

Early microplastics research by WHOI scientists was mostly funded through small grants that allowed them to explore very limited facets of the issue. In 2017 and 2018, WHOI awarded Catalyst Funds—an incubator program funded by private donations—to form the Marine Microplastics Initiative. With the backing of a handful of family foundations, WHOI is launching a Marine Microplastics Innovation Accelerator to help drive innovation and support projects that will have the most impact. “Currently, there are many more questions than answers about the fate and impacts of microplastics in the ocean,” he says. “The growing support from private foundations is critical in enabling the interdisciplinary, cutting-edge research that is needed to understand and solve this global problem.”
Posted in Incredible
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WHOI examines connections between the ocean and human health

The Woods Hole Center for Oceans and Human Health (WHCOHH) is a virtual, interdisciplinary center, based at WHOI, that brings together scientists from oceanographic, biological, and technical institutions to cooperatively address issues of human health as they pertain to oceanographic research. The Woods Hole COHH currently specializes in the study of harmful algal blooms, also known as HABs, or red tide. Researchers are examining how climate change is affecting HAB dynamics, human exposure, and human health impacts, as well as how low-level exposure to HAB neurotoxins may affect early development and behavior later in life. Past research has included the genetic and environmental study of other waterborne pathogens that pose a risk to human health. Together, research and communications efforts at the Center are helping to advance our understanding of HABs and inform action to protect human health from their toxic effects.
Posted in Incredible
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WHOI President & Director Dr. Peter de Menocal Recognized as AAAS Fellow

Dr. Peter de Menocal, President and Director of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution of has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as a AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. This year’s AAAS Fellows will be formally announced in the AAAS News & Notes section of the journal Science on 27 November 2020. As part of the Geology and Geography section, Dr. Peter de Menocal was elected as an AAAS Fellow for his fundamental contributions to understanding human physical and cultural evolution in relation to paleo-environmental change on the African continent. The AAAS Fellow honor comes with an expectation that recipients maintain the highest standards of professional ethics and scientific integrity.
Posted in Best of
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Why we explore deep-water canyons off our coast

Little-known to the 34 million residents on shore, these 90-plus canyons and their deep-water habitats are some of the most productive on the planet. Deep-water coral ecosystems also help support valuable commercial fisheries. Deep-water corals and other canyon inhabitants are vulnerable to rising ocean temperatures, ocean acidification, physical damage from bottom trawling, and other destructive seafloor activities. Although extensive deep-water coral communities were first discovered in the 1970s, these specialized ecosystems have remained largely unexplored. Shank’s team found that deep-water corals often dominate the seafloor canyon landscape.
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Winter Beach, Grand Haven, MI, USA by Thomas Miller

Picture StoryThe lake shore of Lake Michigan can be as beautiful as it is brutal. The day I was at the beach it was around ten degrees Fahrenheit. After shooting the lighthouse, which is the main attraction, I ventured along the beach looking for patterns in the snow and ice. Most of what you see in this photo is called shelf-ice, which is the build up of the waves that freeze along the beach. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
Posted in Beauty
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Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Elects New Corporation Members

The Board of Trustees of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) elected today six new corporation members at its Fall Joint Meeting of the Board and Corporation. “We are delighted to announce this stellar new class of Corporation Members,” said WHOI Corporation Chair Steven Hoch. “Together they bring a wealth of legal and business knowledge to our corporation. We welcome them aboard and are grateful for their commitment of time, talent, and support.”Appointing high-level Corporation Members is an essential component of WHOI’s approach to leadership and outreach. Corporation Members are select leaders in the US and abroad who are passionate about the ocean and dedicated to supporting WHOI’s mission at a time when ocean issues are top of mind for all of humanity.
Posted in Incredible
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Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA by Jonathan Steele

Picture Story"Komorebi" a Japanese term that translates as “the scattered light that filters through when sunlight shines through trees", Captured while hiking in the Back Basin of the Norris Geyser Basin. We had hiked to the Steamboat Geyser and decided to continue on into the Norris Geyser Basin. It had snowed over the past several days and we had to break our own trail in the fresh snow. I have visited Yellowstone in both winter and late spring, by far Yellowstone is best in the winter. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Incredible
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Yosemite Falls, California, USA by Phillip Rubaloff

Picture StoryThis is a picture of Yosemite upper and lower falls taken across the valley floor in late January. My first visit to Yosemite was earlier in my life. It was with my family when I was in my teens. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers. Benefits of VIP membership:• Your own portfolio page – click here to see sample• We promote your portfolio monthly to over 700,000 followers• Download 12 new issues of the magazine every year• Download ALL back issues• Download 2 premium eBooks worth £19.45.
Posted in Best of
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Yosemite NP, California, USA by Anca Popa

Picture StoryYosemite National park is always a great place to visit, but during winter it just transforms into a magical place. As it always happens in photography, sometimes you just need a bit of luck to be at the right moment in time to take a good photo. The snowstorm clouds cleared at the right time to let the sunset rays hit the Sentinel Rock and give it the perfect glow. Hey VisitorDid you know that now we offer a VIP membership? Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
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Yosemite NP, California, USA by Douglas Parks

Picture StoryThe final winter storms start to roll into Yosemite National Park. With the warmer weather the waterfalls begin to flow, slowly but surely. In this was the snowstorm clings to the bare trees and rocks as the flow of water begins to creep over the falls. Hey VisitorDid you know that now we offer a VIP membership? Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.
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Yucca at Sunset, New Mexico, USA by Chip Carroon

Picture StoryI suppose sand dunes are the essence of a desert environment in many peoples’ minds. While that may be the case, sand dunes occupy only two percent of desert landscapes in North America. However, owing to the stark reality of the desert, images depicting the simplicity of the environment may also be interesting. That was the idea in this picture of one of the yucca species in the southwestern United States. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.
Posted in Beauty
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Vol. 51, No. 1, Summer 2014

Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of