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30 years later, traces of an oil spill persist

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Beauty
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A New Ship’s Mission: Let the Deep Sea Be Seen

By William J. Broad
“It was like a fireworks display,” Mr. Dalio recalled. Mr. Dalio talked him into serving as vice chairman of OceanX, an undertaking of Dalio Philanthropies to explore the ocean. Then, in his early 20s, Mr. Dalio learned how to scuba dive and, ever since, has been going deeper. A turning point came in 2011 as he deepened his relationship with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution on Cape Cod in Massachusetts. Other search teams had failed, and Mr. Dalio saw the 2011 success as an indication of the field’s exploratory promise.
Posted in Eye Candy
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A new way of “seeing” offshore wind power cables

By Staff Writer
Internet cables aren’t the only form of underwater wiring vulnerable to snags on the seafloor. High voltage cables supplying power from the mainland to offshore wind farms are also easy targets if they’re not adequately protected. These black, rubber-coated cables are not the most glamorous components of offshore wind—but they’re critical veins of power that wind operators, developers, and coastal communities rely on to keep this brand new source of clean energy in the U.S. going. “Most people focus on the spinning blades of turbines to ensure that an offshore wind energy project will be successful, but the subsea cables that bring that power to land are equally as important,” said Anthony Kirincich, a physical oceanographer at WHOI. “Power can be cut by cable damage from ship anchors, fishing trawlers, or storms.
Posted in Best of
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A transient iceberg kingdom

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Nature
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A tunnel to the Twilight Zone

By Staff Writer
When you’re hungry, wouldn’t it be nice to just slip into a tunnel that rushes you off to a grand buffet? It sounds like something Elon Musk might dream up, but it turns out, certain species of sharks appear to have this luxury. Now, according to a new study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), scientists are seeing a similar activity with blue sharks, which dive through these natural, spinning tunnels at mealtime. The eddies draw warm water deep into the twilight zone where temperatures are normally considerably colder, allowing blue sharks to forage across areas of the open ocean that are often characterized by low prey abundance in surface waters. To track their movements, the researchers tagged more than a dozen blue sharks off the Northeast Coast of the U.S. and monitored them for a period of nine months.
Posted in Best of
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An Immersive Experience: How Renowned Photographers are Captivating Audiences with Prints

By Staff Writer
Great photography in a printed form has the power to truly captivate audiences and enhance the visual message that photographers convey. Ken Browar and Deborah Ory/NYC Dance ProjectAmong many important partnerships in Ken Browar’s life is one with his wife-turned-photographic collaborator Deborah Ory. Both Browar and Ory are fans of traditional printing and were pleasantly surprised with how much they liked this new process. “It felt like the images were floating, like they were 3-dimensional,” Ory says of their exhibition of metal prints mounted on a black wall at Lincoln Center. Making large-scale 40 x 60-inch dye-sublimation on metal prints offers a particular visual quality that brings more light and life to his works.
Posted in Best of
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Antarctic Ice Sheet Loss Expected to Affect Future Climate Change

By Staff Writer
Research simulates dramatic climate impacts for future Antarctic ice sheet meltIn a new climate modeling study that looked at the impacts of accelerated ice melt from the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) on future climate, a team of climate scientists led by Alan Condron at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), reports that future ice-sheet melt is expected to have significant effects on global climate. The study predicts how future climate conditions could change under high and low greenhouse gas emissions scenarios, while accounting for accelerated melting of the AIS. Scientists have long recognized that future meltwater input from the Antarctic will affect the Southern Ocean and global climate, but ice-sheet processes are not currently included in even the most state-of-the-art climate prediction simulations. “In the ice sheet models run by my co-authors Rob DeConto and David Pollard, large parts of the West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) rapidly collapse about 100 years from now,” says Condron. This subsurface warming could make the ice sheet much more unstable and accelerate rates of sea level rise beyond current projections,” Condron says.
Posted in Nature
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Arctic Sea Ice Reaches Second-Lowest Extent

By Staff Writer
Arctic sea ice likely reached its annual minimum extent on September 15, 2020, according to researchers at NASA and the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). The ice extent (white) on that day was far lower than the 1981-2010 average extent for the same day (yellow line). 2020 and 2012 remain the only years when sea ice extent has fallen below 4.0 million square kilometers (1.54 million square miles). “The minimum this year is the unsurprising result of a continued long-term decline in Arctic sea ice,” said Alek Petty, a sea ice scientist NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Also, sea ice was already much thinner going into the 2020 melt season than in years past—the accumulated result of the general long-term decline in summer sea ice extent.
Posted in Incredible
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ARRI Signature Primes Delivered in Full

By Staff Writer
ARRI’s Signature Prime lenses for large-format filmmaking cameras are now available in full through camera rental houses and for sale via venues like B&H. Ranging in price from $24,920 to $39,950 apiece, the 16 focal lengths were first announced alongside the ARRI ALEXA LF in February of 2018. Examples of the different ARRI Signature Prime focal lengths. The large-format ALEXA LF sensor is slightly bigger than full frame.) From 12mm to 280mm, the ARRI Signature Primes have been delivered in full as a set.
Posted in Nature
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As Hurricane Laura raged, silent sentinels kept watch from below

By Staff Writer
According to an NAS publication, the Loop Current is the dominant physical process in the Gulf waters and, as such, can impact everything from oil and gas operations to ecologically-based management of marine resources in the region. It can also have a very direct impact on hurricane development and intensity. “When a tropical storm moves over warm Loop Current waters, it fuels the storm so it can become a hurricane,” says Khazmutdinova. She says that storms can also intensify when they travel over ring-shaped eddies that break off from the main current. “And then we can pump that information into hurricane forecasts to improve predictions there as well.”
Posted in Eye Candy
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Behold the strawberry squid

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Nature
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Bengal Tiger Photo Safari February 2022

By Staff Writer
This 7-day Bengal Tiger photo safari / workshop, located in Bandhavgarh National Park in India, takes you into the wild in luxury. There you will be guided by our professional guides to find the Wild Bengal Tiger and helped by our award-winning wildlife photographers to gain those memorable wildlife photographs that you crave for. From the Bengal Tiger and the Indian Leopard, all the way to the many species of deer and forest birds, you will have the opportunity to photograph and create a showcase of professional images and gain those memorable experiences of an Indian Wild Tiger Safari. Located right outside of Bandhavgarh National Park, our five-star lodge awaits your arrival where you will be accompanied with beverages and a very warm welcome. Each evening you will get the chance to fine dine with complimentary beverages of all kinds to make your Indian safari a memory of a lifetime.
Posted in Nature
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Brisingids sea stars are the velcro of the deep sea

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Nature
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Can you spot the eunumid crab?

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Incredible
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Caught on camera: Scientists and fishermen team up to film seals in fishing nets

By Staff Writer
Fishery bycatch—the accidental entanglement or capture in nets of animals that are not the intended target fish—is a leading cause of injury and death of seals and other marine mammals. Conversely, depredation—the eating of fish from nets by marine predators such as seals—can ruin a commercial fishing catch and cause expensive damage to nets and other fishing gear. For the first time, the team has been able to capture underwater video of gillnet fishing in the Northeast U.S., catching seals, spiny dogfish, and other predators on camera as they approach and enter the nets. To film depredation in action, Bocconcelli and the team attached an array of five underwater cameras across the top or “headrope” of a gillnet. The team has collected close to 100 hours of video footage, which is still being analyzed.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Cracking Icy Secrets of New Penguin Colonies

By Staff Writer
Populations of krill, a staple of the penguin diet, flourish where there is ample sea ice. “To understand penguin habitat, it is important to understand what is happening with sea ice dynamics surrounding their colonies,” Wethington said. These data provide a high-resolution look at the location and width of leads in the sea ice. Each point on the lines represents a location along the satellite’s orbital path where the sensor detected open water. The maps show more leads and open water in the northern reaches of the peninsula, which makes sense because temperatures generally warm as you move toward the equator.
Posted in Nature
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Deciphering the Impacts of a Changing Ocean on Scallop Fisheries

By Staff Writer
The current scallop management program rotates access for scallop fishers between open and closed areas. When resource managers detect high abundances of small scallops in an area, that area can be closed to fishing to allow the scallops to grow larger. It is also critical to be able to use these changes in environmental conditions as predictors of scallop fishers’ behavior, such as choice of fishing routes and harvest locations. To better understand the socioeconomic impacts of a changing ocean on the sea scallop industry, WHOI biologist Rubao Ji and colleagues, in collaboration with scientists from NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service and UMass Dartmouth, used new data on scallop catches and scallop spatial distributions (stocks) to model the relationship between catch per unit effort and scallop stocks. Together, this suite of models will enable managers to assess fishing community vulnerability under climate change, with important policy implications for the area management program.
Posted in Incredible
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Ecuador Birds Photography Adventure June 2021

By Staff Writer
Ecuador, a land mass the size of Colorado, hosts 1 out of every 5 bird species on the planet making it the 4th highest nation on earth for bird diversity. What is new is the partnership between small landowners and conservation that has protected habitat and yields an incredible opportunity to see and photograph a huge variety of birds in conditions that enable great photographic art! We have also included a session of multi-flash hummingbird photography. We could go on and on gushing about all that you can see and photograph but space is limited here, click the sidebar button to see many more images and learn about this exciting photography adventure! Pricing$5900 Double Occupancy, $6500 Single OccupancyPlease see our COVID-19 Response and Offer on the Directory Company Page for Nature Photography Adventures
Posted in Beauty
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‘High-octane’ hurricane fuel swirls in the Gulf of Mexico

By Staff Writer
An already warm Gulf of Mexico will once again be heating up this summer thanks to one of the Atlantic Ocean’s fastest and warmest currents—the Loop Current—which carries warm water from the Caribbean Sea up past the western tip of Cuba and into the Gulf. There, huge swirling rings of deep warm water the size of Maine will break off from the primary current and wander westward through the Gulf, providing a potent heat source that could cause hurricanes travelling overhead to rapidly intensify. “I’ve heard these ring-shaped eddies—and the Loop Current from which they detach—described as ‘high-octane fuel’ for hurricanes,” says Heather Furey, a research specialist at WHOI. “Where the rings are in relation to the path of a hurricane can have a significant effect on the storm’s intensity.”Hurricane Rita in 2005 is a case in point. Before slamming into the Gulf Coast that year, the storm passed directly over one of the Loop Current's eddies, which caused it to explode into a monster Category 5 hurricane before making landfall.
Posted in Best of
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How Long Does Plastic Persist in the Ocean?

By Staff Writer
The numbers are staggering: as many as 8 million tons of plastic end up in the ocean every year. Exacerbating concerns for ocean life and human health is the perception that plastics last indefinitely in the environment. Different formulations behave differently in the environment, which means different plastics break down in the ocean at different rates. For example, many plastic additives react chemically to light, leading plastics with additives to degrade more quickly in sunlight. These experiments will provide the first realistic, verifiable estimates of the lifetime of plastic goods in the environment—a critical step towards quantifying the risks associated with plastic pollution.
Posted in Nature
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Icefields Parkway Photo Tour Sep 2021

By Staff Writer
The Icefields Parkway is considered one of the most delightful highways in the world. However, wayward Canadians do not agree with this opinion at all and consider this route the most beautiful ever. The variety of fantastic landscapes and the purest intoxicating mountain air will take your breath away. The route will cover three national parks: Jasper, Yoho and Banff. We are going to travel on a relatively small area of these parks, in the Rocky Mountains, for 14 days, discovering the most wonderful season – the Indian summer.
Posted in Incredible
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Kenya Photography Safari Sep 2021

By C. J. Lindsey, Omar Costa
Kenya is famous to photographers for four things: Diversity, Species Protection, Masai Mara and Amboseli. This photographic safari is designed to deliver the first three - and with the extension, Amboseli. It is timed to coincide with the Crossing of the Mara River by the Great Migration of wildebeest and zebras. It delivers 3 kinds of giraffes, both kinds of rhinos in ways that support dramatic photography, and chimpanzees. We will be there helping you make great photographic decisions - with excellent guides to help you understand what you are seeing.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Katmai Alaska Bears Photo Adventure July 2022

By Staff Writer
Bears, which are normally solitary creatures, gather to feast on this momentary pause. We will find mothers with cubs and we will watch as bears showcase a number of unique styles of fishing. This program is built around five days of flying in small float planes to meet up with the current collection of bears deep in Alaska’s Katmai Peninsula. But, we will also have opportunities to photograph bears catching jumping salmon at Brooks Falls. Cost$9,990 Double Occupancy; $11,490, Single OccupancyGroup Size7 participants or five rooms, whichever comes first.
Posted in Best of
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Latest Assignment • WIN $100 cash with LEE Filters

By Staff Writer
Weather in Patagonia is very temperamental and unpredictable, like curtains that can closes and open in a seconds. I guess to go this place you need to be skilled or a good photographer to shoot with all these kind of weather conditions. They say there's no such a bad weather into a good photographer. So I moved back and went down right away even though i didn't get the shots that I want. I can't wait to go back to these kind of adventures after the Covid and all the exploration around the world.
Posted in Incredible
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Mauritius oil spill: Don't assume the worst

By Opinion Christopher Reddy
(CNN) Few sights prompt such dispiriting gut punches as an oil spill casting a blackened pall on pristine waters, beaches, and wildlife. I'm a scientist who has studied oil spills all over the world for more than three decades, including the Deepwater Horizon disaster in 2010. I've learned that the way an oil spill unfolds is not always simple or straightforward, and the worst-case scenario isn't a fait accompli. The Deepwater Horizon oil spill spread some 160 million gallons of crude oil along more than 1,300 miles of coastline. Despite our efforts, of course, there are lingering environmental impacts from Deepwater Horizon and many uncertainties about long-term effects.
Posted in Nature
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Mystical Egypt Photo Tour April 2021

By Staff Writer
This immersive historical, cultural and photographic tour with McKay Photography Academy takes you on a journey into Ancient Egypt where you will experience a unique modern age mixed with the ancient old in a culture unlike anywhere else in the world. Guests with all levels of photographic experience, beginner through advanced are welcome! This tour will have an incredible 14 client / 3 instructor ratio and even if you are brand new to photography, there is NO NEED to feel intimidated on joining us! • Tour of Philae Temple and High Dam of Aswan• Disembark in Aswan• Softel Legend Old Cataract Hotel – One of the top hotels in the world! • Optional temple tours, museum tours, or relaxing by the pool• Flight from Aswan to Cairo Included
Posted in Incredible
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Nereid Under Ice explores Aurora hydrothermal vent field

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Nature
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New $69 Ranger DSLR Mini Sling for Cameras from HEX

By Staff Writer
As a streamlined solution for “on-the-go” shooters, the $69 Ranger DSLR Mini Sling is even more compact than their popular $99 Ranger DSLR Sling, which it otherwise mimics. The new $69 HEX Mini Sling for a DSLR and accessories joins several camera bag and case models that feature the modern urban designs of HEX Brand. The affordable new $69 HEX Brand HEX Mini DSLR Sling bag for a single camera or accessories. Sized at 2.5 liters, the HEX Mini DSLR Sling is capable of holding a single DSLR, a few lenses or Vlogging kits and peripherals. The HEX Ranger Mini DSLR Sling will hold a single camera and lens or accessories.
Posted in Beauty
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Nikon Announces D780 Full-Frame DSLR, P950 CoolPix and New Telephotos

By Staff Writer
“It feels like a D750 but looks like a D850,” Nikon explained during a pre-briefing on the new new full-frame $2,299 Nikon D780 DSLR. Building on the similar Nikon D750, the Nikon D780 removes the internal flash. For the first time in a Nikon Lens, the SR Shortwave Reduction element will address chromatic aberrations found below the blue spectrum to address problems like purple fringing. Combining internal lens stabilizations with in-camera body stabilization, the lens can provide up to five stops of shake reduction. Updating their most popular non-interchangeable camera from the P900, the $799 Nikon CoolPix P950 has the same 16-megapixel 1/2.3” sensor and 83x zoom lens with 24-2000mm equivalence.
Posted in Nature
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North Atlantic Ocean yields clues for better weather predictions

By Staff Writer
“Our knowledge of the interaction”—between the ocean and the atmosphere—“was mostly one way,” says Kwon, a senior scientist in WHOI’s Department of Physical Oceanography. A June paper that Kwon coauthored shows that “atmospheric blocking,” over the North Atlantic, a weather phenomenon that stalls the normal progression of weather, can be predicted due to its relationship to the ocean, and natural variability in the North Atlantic. This finding “will lead to more attention to how the ocean can be an important source of predictability in weather and climate,” says Kwon. The ability to forecast atmospheric blocking could have far-reaching implications for predicting its impact on elements of the Earth system such agriculture, sea ice, fisheries, and long-range weather. Atmospheric blocking above Greenland usually brings warmer temperatures that are favorable to Greenland ice melt.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Observing Mooring Deployment at Pioneer Array

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. A pioneer in the development of deep-sea submersibles and remotely operated vehicle systems, he has taken part in more than 155 deep-sea expeditions. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Beauty
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Ocean acidification causing coral ‘osteoporosis’ on iconic reefs

By Staff Writer
New research from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) reveals the distinct impact that ocean acidification is having on coral growth on some of the world’s iconic reefs. “This is the first unambiguous detection and attribution of ocean acidification’s impact on coral growth,” says lead author and WHOI scientist Weifu Guo. This phenomenon, known as ocean acidification, has led to a 20 percent decrease in the concentration of carbonate ions in seawater. Ocean acidification targets the density of the skeleton, silently whittling away at the coral’s strength, much like osteoporosis weakens bones in humans. The compounding effects of temperature, local stressors, and now ocean acidification will be devastating for many reefs.”
Posted in Best of
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Orpheus explores the ocean’s greatest depths

By Staff Writer
Orpheus explores the ocean’s greatest depthsOrpheus, an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by WHOI, begins its descent into Veatch Canyon on the continental shelf off of the U.S. Northeast during one of several dives from the R/V Neil Armstrong in September 2019. The small, lightweight vehicle is the first in a new class of AUVs designed to withstand the pressure of the ocean’s greatest depths, while working independently or as a networked “fleet” to explore and conduct research in the deepest parts of our planet. Data collected with Orpheus will enable greater understanding of the ocean’s hadal zone (20,000 to 36,000 feet deep) and usher in a new era of hadal research. This includes investigations into trench ecosystems, and novel adaptations that have evolved to sustain life under extreme pressures in the deepest regions of our ocean. Photo by Evan Kovacs, Marine Imaging Technologies, LLC / Courtesy of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Posted in Beauty
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Our Ocean. Our Planet. Our Future.

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of
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Photo District News (PDN) to Be Retired, Rangefinder Shifts to All-Digital Format

By Staff Writer
NEW YORK — Emerald Expositions announced that as of today, Photo District News (PDN) will no longer publish content. Rangefinder will shift to an all-digital content hub with the WPPI exclusive edition distributed at the show this February 23-27 in Las Vegas. There will be greater integration between Rangefinder and WPPI. AboutRangefinder, WPPI, and PHOTOPLUS are owned by Emerald Expositions, a leading operator of business-to-business trade shows in the United States. The company currently operates more than 55 trade shows, as well as numerous other face-to-face events.
Posted in Beauty
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Polar Yamal Photo Tour February 2021

By Staff Writer
Year after year, this world is getting smaller and smaller under the onslaught of civilisation. The internet and fashionable gadgets, social networks and television impose refined culture of consumption and new rules of life. Polar Yamal is one such place. Vast distances, tough climate and complete lack of infrastructure have preserved the unique culture of the indigenous people of Polar Yamal. Visiting our website you can also see our videos about this trip.
Posted in Nature
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Puffin study encourages us to be mindful of our “sound footprint”

By Staff Writer
ARAN: They’re not just influenced by loud sounds, like a jet going overhead; But they’re also influenced by relatively quiet sounds. ARAN: We often think of the really loud sounds like underwater explosions or drilling for oil or maybe sonar. But small increases in the background noise, at least small disturbances can really influence the animals. So, after years of studying sound in animals, Mooney says it’s clear that our impact on noise may have the furtherest reaching consequences across the animal kingdom. ARAN: Even just in the areas we’ve been studying puffins we’ve worked in somewhat secret habitats, meaning there aren’t a lot of tourists visiting these areas.
Posted in Incredible
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Rising Tides: Preparing for the Future

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of
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Sentry dives to a biological oasis

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Incredible
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'SharkCam' films basking sharks off Scotland

By Staff Writer
'SharkCam' films basking sharks off Scotland Published duration 28 Augustimage copyright WHOI image caption The sharks were observed swimming just above the seabedA robot camera has been used in UK seas for the first time to monitor the behaviour of basking sharks. SharkCam was deployed off the west coast of Scotland where the sharks gather to breed after migrating from waters off west Africa. Basking sharks, an endangered species, are the world's second largest fish after whale sharks, sometimes growing to more than 10m (33ft) long. But studying the footage gathered last summer by SharkCam, scientists noted the sharks spent long periods just above the seabed and were not feeding. image copyright WHOI image caption A basking shark close to the surface with its mouth open in feeding behaviourNatureScot, formerly Scottish Natural Heritage, worked on the project with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, WWF/Sky Ocean Rescue and the University of Exeter.
Posted in Best of
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Studies investigate marine heatwaves, shifting ocean currents

By Staff Writer
In the ocean, extreme warming conditions are also becoming more frequent and intense. Two new studies from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) investigate marine heatwaves and currents at the edge of the continental shelf, which impact regional ocean circulation and marine life. During El Niño periods, the temperature and salinity anomalies associated with marine heatwaves are limited to the ocean surface, showing that complex ocean processes play an important role in the depth-extent of extreme events. Ryan and her colleagues are using a similar modeling approach to study marine heatwaves in the Northwest Atlantic. “The challenge, wherever you go, is that marine heatwaves have so many drivers,” Ryan said.
Posted in Beauty
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The $500 billion question: what’s the value of studying the ocean’s biological carbon pump?

By Staff Writer
The ocean plays an invaluable role in capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere, taking in somewhere between five to 12 gigatons (billion tons) annually. The biological carbon pump is fueled by tiny plant-like organisms floating on the ocean surface called phytoplankton, which consume carbon dioxide in the process of photosynthesis. A warmer, more acidic ocean could weaken the carbon pump, causing atmospheric temperatures to rise—or it could get stronger, with the opposite effect. “Not only do we not know how big this pump is, we don’t know whether it will remove more or less carbon dioxide in the future. Though the paper’s assessment doesn’t account for the cost of a global research program, Buesseler said that investment would be a small fraction of the $500 billion expected benefit.
Posted in Best of
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The Hasselblad XCD 4/45P Lens Expands the X System to 10 Lenses

By Staff Writer
At a size of 1.85 inches in depth and weight of only 0.71 pounds, the new $1,099 Hasselblad XCD 4/45P lens enters their XCD lens family of medium-format lenses as the lightest, most compact model available. The XCD 4/45P is roughly the same width as the X1D II 50C camera. The X1D II 50C with new XCD 4/45P lens at roughly 36mm in 35mm equivalence. Keep your eyes to the February issue of PDN for our full review of the Hasselblad X System X1D II 50C camera. The Hasselblad XCD 4/45P lens will ship by the end of this month.
Posted in Nature
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The Metrics You Need to Measure Marketing Automation Effectiveness

By Kathy Powers
Monitor Behavioral TriggersSupporter behavior is a crucial metric to track as it’s what drives your email marketing automation campaign. The Response MetricsOkay, your activity metrics point to the practical use of marketing automation. These metrics will show you whether your nonprofit email marketing efforts are resonating with the audience and answer the question of audience engagement levels. But… email marketing automation often tends to deliver more messages. This is also your best metric for proving the ROI on your email marketing automation.
Posted in Best of
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The New Zealand Photographer Everyone Should Know

By Staff Writer
“Urban Drift,” an exhibition featuring Westra’s photographs, is on view at Anastasia Photo in New York through February 22. After moving to New Zealand from The Netherlands in 1957, Westra embarked on a career as a full-time freelance documentary photographer. Primarily working for the Department of Education and Te Ao Hou, a Māori magazine, Westra traveled extensively throughout New Zealand and the South Pacific. A pioneer of the New Zealand documentary photography genre, Westra developed a humanist style known for its realism and spontaneity. “Urban Drift”By Ans WestraAnastasia PhotoThrough February 22, 2020Related ArticlesLessons in Wild SummersGoing Inside the Infamous Mongrel MobsNew Zealand Glaciers
Posted in Incredible
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The Ukrainian Soldiers Who Can’t Rest

By Staff Writer
Blatty knows about war. A combat veteran of Afghanistan and Iraq, in 2018 she embedded with volunteer soldiers of the war in eastern Ukraine. “Frontline / Peace Life: Ukraine’s Revolutionaries of the Forgotten War,” a new exhibition at the Ukrainian Institute of America, chronicles Blatty’s determination to document the Ukrainian soldiers’ fierce patriotism and the struggles they faced to return home after years on the frontline. When Blatty went to Ukraine, drawn by the community soldiers create, she intended to “document and preserve a form a patriotism” far from her own reality of fighting wars. But how was I a patriot for simply doing what Uncle Sam told me to do, under contracted obligation?” asks Blatty.
Posted in Incredible
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The value of green infrastructure for coastal communities

By Staff Writer
Global climate change is increasing the threats of storms and sea-level rise to coastal communities. As a result, coastal cities such as New York and Boston—as well as many smaller coastal communities—are considering investing in “green” infrastructure to enhance their resilience to coastal hazards. Green infrastructure creates or maintains a “living shoreline” that can include wetlands, oyster reefs, barrier islands, and ecologically enhanced bulkheads and revetments. If green infrastructure is well-integrated into a larger upland-to-wetland landscape, it can provide important habitat for plants and animals. By giving coastal managers a new tool to assess the economic value of the ecosystem services associated with living shorelines, this new methodology should facilitate the wider inclusion of green infrastructure in climate adaptation planning and coastal protection, to the benefit of coastal communities and the environment.
Posted in Incredible
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This Week in Photography & Filmmaking Gear

By Staff Writer
** News **The Canon EOS-1 DX Mark III Is Here – PDNAnd So Is the Nikon D780 – RangefinderNew Incredibly Tiny Light Kits for Filmmakers – Cinema 5DCanon Has a Lightroom Plugin for Image Culling – Digital TrendsLenovo Intros Smart Digital Frame – MashableInsta360’s New Modular Camera – NewsshooterSanDisk Rolls Out 8TB SSD Drive – EngadgetDell’s New Laptops Break the Rules – CNETWant a 55-inch Monitor? Acer’s Got One – VergeDell’s New Laptop Has a Jazzed Up Display – ARS TechnicaMacOS Messes with Canon-Lightroom Tethering – PetaPixelDEALS: Last Chance Rebates, Expiring Soon** Reviews **First Look at the Nikon D6 – DP Review5 Reasons Why Android Still Tops iOS in 2020 – Pro Video CoalitionInitial Review of the Canon EOS-1 DX Mark III – DP ReviewWhy I’m Sticking with Lightroom Classic, For Now – PetaPixelDEALS: Shop the Deal of the Day** Tips **Three Things Most Photogs Get Wrong About Flash – SLR LoungePhotoshop Sharpening for Beginners – Digital Photography SchoolOur Top Five Tips of 2019 – PDNHow to Photographic Atmospheric Glassware – WorkphloWhy High ISO Is Not Your Enemy – PhotoFocus** Buyers Guides**15 of the Best Photoshop Add-Ons – We and the ColorFour Powerful Laptops for Pros – Popular ScienceGreat Backdrops and Props for Portrait Photographers – Rangefinder
Posted in Nature
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Transformative technology to revolutionize the way we listen to the deep ocean

By Staff Writer
Most of the ocean is visually inaccessible to humans. The ocean is also impenetrable to many communication and geolocation technologies, such as radio waves, GPS, and other forms of electromagnetic radiation. Sound travels effectively through seawater—a feature known to marine mammals, which have evolved to use sound to communicate, find food, and navigate underwater. Oceanographers have also taken advantage of sound’s ability to propagate through seawater, using underwater acoustic technologies to greatly advance our understanding of the ocean and marine ecosystems. But using sound to “see” into a noisy ocean has its challenges, and it can be difficult to distinguish individual acoustic signatures amidst the cacophony of the underwater soundscape.
Posted in Beauty
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Two great white sharks tagged off the coast of Mass., and you can track one of them on Twitter

By Staff Writer
“Just letting you all know that I’m off the coast of Nantucket a little south from where I was tagged,” Andromache tweeted on Tuesday. AdvertisementThe OCEARCH team tagged Andromache during a research trip called Expedition Massachusetts, which launched earlier this month. The second great white that OCEARCH tagged, dubbed Monomoy after the island he was spotted near, measured 6 feet, 7 inches long — smaller than most sharks that have been observed in the area. “At 6′ 7″ long, he’s the smallest shark we’ve tagged in this area,” OCEARCH tweeted. “It was a male white shark less than 7 feet long.
Posted in Incredible
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Ultimate New Zealand Photography Tour April 2021

By Staff Writer
Join Richard Young, Ken Wright and Shaun Barnett, on an 18-day photography tour showcasing some of New Zealand's most iconic landscape including Milford Sound and the Moeraki Boulders along with some of the country's exceptional coastal wildlife. For the first four days of our tour we will be based in Wanaka and take in our Autumn Masterclass Workshop, designed to perfect your techniques of shooting autumn landscapes, autumn abstracts and panoramic landscape photography. It will leave you with refined skills to help create stunning photographs for the rest of the tour. North of the Catlins we will explore the Otago Peninsula known as New Zealand’s wildlife capital. Doubtful Sound is far more remote and scenic than the well-known Milford Sound, offering a true wilderness experience.
Posted in Incredible
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Visual Stories to Fight the Stigma of HIV

By Staff Writer
Through Positive Eyes is a photography and storytelling project created in collaboration with 130 “artivists” living with HIV/AIDS. The project serves “as a call to action to bring an end to the stigma of HIV,” writes Aperture in the press release. “Stigma grows out of fear, which prevents people from getting themselves tested and treated,” writes Gere. In the exhibition, a multitude of voices coalesce around the core belief that challenging stigma is the most effective way to combat the epidemic. That’s what Through Positive Eyes is all about,” writes Gere.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Vol. 39, No. 2, November 1996

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Vol. 40, No. 1, April 1997

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Nature
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Vol. 40, No. 2, November 1997

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Beauty
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Vol. 41, No. 1, April 1998

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of
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Vol. 41, No. 2, December 1998

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Beauty
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Vol. 42, No. 1, April 2000

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Incredible
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Vol. 42, No. 2, April 2004

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of
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Vol. 43, No. 1, November 2004

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Incredible
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Vol. 43, No. 2, December 2004

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Beauty
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Vol. 44, No. 1, June 2005

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Nature
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Vol. 44, No. 2, September 2005

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Vol. 44, No. 3, December 2005

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Incredible
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Vol. 45, No. 1, April 2006

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Nature
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Vol. 45, No. 2, August 2006

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Vol. 45, No. 3, July 2007

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Incredible
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Vol. 46, No. 1, January 2008

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Incredible
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Vol. 46, No. 2, April 2008

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of
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Vol. 46, No. 3, September 2008

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of
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Vol. 47, No. 1, December 2008

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of
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Vol. 47, No. 2, September 2009

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Vol. 47, No. 3, December 2009

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Beauty
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Vol. 48, No. 1, June 2010

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Nature
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Vol. 48, No. 2, December 2010

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Vol. 48, No. 3, October 2011

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Beauty
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Vol. 49, No. 1, December 2011

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Incredible
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Vol. 49, No. 2, May 2012

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Beauty
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Vol. 49, No. 3, December 2012

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Incredible
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Vol. 50, No. 1, Spring 2013

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Beauty
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Vol. 50, No. 2, Fall 2013

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of
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Vol. 51, No. 1, Summer 2014

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of
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Vol. 51, No. 2, Winter 2016

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of
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Vol. 52, No. 1, Summer 2016

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Vol. 52, No. 2, Spring 2017

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Nature
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Vol. 53, No. 1, Winter 2017

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Best of
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Vol. 53, No. 2, Fall 2018

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Vol. 54, No. 1, Spring 2019

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Beauty
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Vol. 54, No. 2, Fall 2019

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Beauty
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Vol. 55, No. 1, Spring 2020

By Staff Writer
Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.
Posted in Nature
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WHOI examines connections between the ocean and human health

By Staff Writer
The Woods Hole Center for Oceans and Human Health (WHCOHH) is a virtual, interdisciplinary center, based at WHOI, that brings together scientists from oceanographic, biological, and technical institutions to cooperatively address issues of human health as they pertain to oceanographic research. The Woods Hole COHH currently specializes in the study of harmful algal blooms, also known as HABs, or red tide. Researchers are examining how climate change is affecting HAB dynamics, human exposure, and human health impacts, as well as how low-level exposure to HAB neurotoxins may affect early development and behavior later in life. Past research has included the genetic and environmental study of other waterborne pathogens that pose a risk to human health. Together, research and communications efforts at the Center are helping to advance our understanding of HABs and inform action to protect human health from their toxic effects.
Posted in Eye Candy
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Why we explore deep-water canyons off our coast

By Staff Writer
Little-known to the 34 million residents on shore, these 90-plus canyons and their deep-water habitats are some of the most productive on the planet. Deep-water coral ecosystems also help support valuable commercial fisheries. Deep-water corals and other canyon inhabitants are vulnerable to rising ocean temperatures, ocean acidification, physical damage from bottom trawling, and other destructive seafloor activities. Although extensive deep-water coral communities were first discovered in the 1970s, these specialized ecosystems have remained largely unexplored. Shank’s team found that deep-water corals often dominate the seafloor canyon landscape.
Posted in Beauty