Drones, Scat, and the Joys of Marine Mammal Fieldwork in Alaska
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Robert Ballard, Ocean ExplorerRobert D. Ballard is Founder and President of the Ocean Exploration Trust; Director of the Center for Ocean Exploration and Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. He is an Explorer-At-Large at the National Geographic Society, Commissioner for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a Research Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served in the U.S. Navy for more than 30 years and continues to work with the Office of Naval Research. He has also discovered hydrothermal vents and “black smokers” in the Galapagos Rift and East Pacific Rise in 1977 and 1979. His honors include 22 Honorary Doctorates, National Geographic’s highest award, the Hubbard Medal, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.

Can icebergs be towed to water-starved cities?
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He’s been studying the possibility of towing an iceberg from Antarctica to Cape Town, South Africa, which recently experienced a water crisis. “Large icebergs could be used to alleviate drought and supply a city with water,” Condron says. It’s pure and fresh.”The big towResearchers have floated the idea of long-distance iceberg towing for decades. He says that with today’s sophisticated computer modeling technologies, he can accurately simulate a long-distance iceberg tow to Cape Town. Researchers have proposed mooring such bergs about 18 miles off of Cape Town in order to harvest water from them.

What's In That Water? 'Geochemical Santa Claus' Offers New Data To Climate Modelers
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That new data should help researchers make better models of Earth’s past and future climate. This is a number that so many modelers have wanted,” says lead study author Kimberley Mayfield, with a laugh. The additional data should lead to better models of Earth’s past climate, says Matthew Charette, a senior scientist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and co-author on the paper. He says improving models of the past should help us better understand the current changes in Earth’s climate. “We want to improve climate models for reasons that I believe are obvious at this point,” says Mayfield.

On the high seas
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There is a big difference between living on the coast and actually going out to sea, says WHOI Trustee Sam Coleman. Being at sea was a world away from talking about ocean science at meetings, according to WHOI corporation member Eric Anderson. “I came away with a visceral appreciation for the WHOI mission and so incredibly impressed by the Armstrong team,” he says. “You’re on a ship that is pitching in 12-foot seas and you have this couple-thousand-pound vehicle you’re trying to get into the water and back out again. “All of us observing were caught up in the drama because there was no guaranteed happy ending,” he says.

Greater data access gives Northeast fishermen an edge against a warming ocean
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One of those obstacles occurred last month, when warm water from the Gulf Stream seeped into fishing and lobstering grounds around Block Island. Together, the two have been engaged in a long-term data collection effort to track changes occurring over the continental shelf waters. DANIEL: Normally, Ellertson hears about these warm core rings from Glen. We give fishermen access to the data always, so they have ownership of the data. DANIEL: Gawarkiewicz says this bodes well for adaptation in New England’s fisheries, at a time when warming seas will likely mean more frequent warm core rings, something he says is already evident in historical data.

Elgol, Isle of Skye, Scotland by Ken Rennie
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Picture StoryI was hoping for either a stormy evening or a spectacular sunset but neither happened. So it was a 10 stop filter and see what a long exposure would bring. I couldn't get an image so I just stood and watched entranced by their beautiful presence. Hey VisitorDid you know that now we offer a VIP membership? Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.

Yosemite Falls, California, USA by Phillip Rubaloff
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Picture StoryThis is a picture of Yosemite upper and lower falls taken across the valley floor in late January. My first visit to Yosemite was earlier in my life. It was with my family when I was in my teens. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers. Benefits of VIP membership:• Your own portfolio page – click here to see sample• We promote your portfolio monthly to over 700,000 followers• Download 12 new issues of the magazine every year• Download ALL back issues• Download 2 premium eBooks worth £19.45.

Frosty Morning, Welburn, England by Richard Burdon
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We’d had a cold spell and the temperature had been below zero all week, but all my efforts to capture a winter scene had eluded me so far. This feeling of elation must be the same sort of emotion film workers experience when they see an image appear in their developing tray. I love the delicacy of the frost on the tree and the background just visible in the morning mist gives me that separation and simplicity I was looking for. Two hours after this shot was taken, it thawed and never froze again for the remainder of the year. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.

Keilvatnet, Lofoten Islands, Norway by Michael Thomas
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Picture StoryIn the winter of 2018, my wife and I spent a week in Reine and Leknes before visiting Iceland. We had to fly to Reykjavik, then to Oslo, to Bodo, stay overnight there, before finally flying to Leknes. On our way to investigate Eggum Beach, 20 or so km north of Leknes, we drove past Keilvatnet. It was solidly frozen over, so I carefully went out a bit to look for some interesting angles or foreground. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.

Eagle River, Alaska, USA by Ray Bulson
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A favorite atmospheric phenomenon of mine is called the Belt of Venus. The Belt of Venus is more pronounced during the winter months. Living in the subarctic region of Alaska, I have observed that the color of the band intensifies as the temperature drops. The pink of the Belt of Venus is a beautiful, rich magenta which contrasts nicely with the dark green spruce. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.

Tracing Changes in Ozone-Depleting Chemicals
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For more than 30 years, nations have been working to protect Earth’s stratospheric ozone layer by banning the new production and trade of ozone-depleting substances. Part of that effort has included tracking the atmospheric concentration of such chemicals. In the 1970 and 80s, scientists discovered that chemicals widely used in refrigerants and insulating foams were rising into the stratosphere. Even after production ceased, scientists still expected chemicals like CFC-11 to continue leaking from existing products for years, but at a gradually declining rate. In 2018, NOAA first reported that atmospheric CFC-11 had declined less than expected, hinting that something had changed.

Free Feature • A Guide To Winter Landscape Photography
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Follow us Follow usWith winter approaching fast on the upper hemisphere, landscape photographers are looking forward to getting out there and creating their masterpieces. Mark Bauer helped us put together the ultimate guide to winter landscape photography Mark BauerIf you asked non-photographers what their favourite season is, it is likely that few would say winter. Yet, a huge number of photographers name it as their favourite time of year for landscape photography. At its best, winter delivers a wealth of photographic opportunities, including frosty sunrises, colourful sunsets and dramatic, stormy skies. The weather in winter can be unpredictable to say the least, and it can be daunting heading out into the cold on a freezing winter morning.

Nuns Cross Farm, Dartmoor, Devon, England by Chris Marshall
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Picture StorySnowfall in the Southwest of England is a rarity because the weather is generally very mild. My final plan was to photograph Nuns Cross Farm in the snow for the first time. It wasn’t long before the dense fog cleared revealing a band of ethereal mist above the old farm building about four hundred metres away. The layer of mist was moving quickly from left to right so I had to find an attractive composition swiftly. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.

Below Old Mans Cave, Logan, Ohio, USA by Roy Goldsberry
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Picture StoryI have been to visit Hocking Hills State Park near Logan, Ohio several times. There are several, separated areas that make up the park, and we decided to start with Old Mans Cave the next morning. In the stream at that spot, there is a rock shelf that the water flows over, and it had made an ice fall in addition to the waterfall. The pool just below that had also frozen over very smoothly, and allowed for a very fine reflection of the ice fall formations. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.

Kubota Garden, Seattle, WA, USA by Joe Campisi
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Picture StoryKubota Garden is a beautiful Japanese garden located in Seattle. It's a beautiful place to visit anytime of the year, especially stunning in the fall. But maybe the most special time to visit is when a rare Seattle snowfall blankets the garden. I've always wanted to visit and photograph the garden in snow since I saw an image in a book about Seattle over a decade ago. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.

Jasper NP, Alberta, Canada by Larry Day
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Picture StoryTrudging through heavy snow in the mountains, I had expected to come across some stunning wide vista. Instead, the heavy fresh snow had made unique images throughout the fallen trees. I reminded myself as I trudged on that the beautiful nature I was in was home to much more than people visiting National Parks. Hey VisitorDid you know that now we offer a VIP membership? Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.

Life Is Tough for Teenage Parasites
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But our understanding of the deep-sea trematode’s life cycle ends with the zoarcid. So it’s unsurprising that no one has ever figured out the complete life cycle of any deep-sea trematode. And on that fateful day when the snail’s life ends, the rest of the trematode’s life begins. Gabriel AlcalaDykman deciphered her first trematode life cycle in Santa Barbara in the spring of 2016, while she was an undergrad in Kuris’s parasitology lab. It’s not just that the worms maintain their ludicrously complicated life cycle in a rare oasis of life in one of the most hostile regions on Earth.

Numa Falls, Kootenay NP, Canada by Tanner Strachan
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Picture StorySometimes life can really hit the spot. I was fortunate enough to visit Numa Falls during a solo day trip through Kootenay National Park in December of last year. The fresh snowfall brought with it a blanket of silence, and all that I could hear was the water rushing below my feet. The azure-blue water cut through the scene so vividly it was as though the rest of the world was black and white. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.

Snowdunes, Lobith, Gelderland, The Netherlands by Ellen Borggreve
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I had wanted to take some pictures of trees in the snow, but the snow was too deep to wade through and at this point I was up until my hips in the snow. I decided to go much more abstract than usual just because this was the only way to show how surreal the landscape was. I found this interesting S curve formed by the water of the Old Rhine and the snow dunes. The resulting image was as good as monochromatic and so I decided to desaturate little colour that was there. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.

Ice Details, Autria by Sonja Jordan
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Picture StoryI was on a nice winter hiking with snow shoes in the mountains when I noticed a small lake near the hiking path. On closer inspection I discovered frozen air bubbles in the ice. So I took my macro lense and could take much pictures of ice details. I like such minimalistic pictures of details with shapes, forms and different colours. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.

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